#Withbutterfliesandwarriors Instagram Photos & Videos

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2 days ago

Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - watching the Samburu looking every bit like a giant centipede shaking and thrusting it’s way forward across the dry earth of northern Kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors #kenya #northernkenya #conservation

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6 days ago

Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - sometimes the temptation to check oneself out is just, well, too great, particularly when you’re a lady hornbill presented with a clean window 💚 #northernkenya #kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors

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6 days ago

Posted @withrepost@chancellordavid Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - Samburu moran (warrior ) from the series #withbutterfliesandwarriors - northern Kenya #kenya #northernkenya #conservation @ewasolions @noblemagazineofficial

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6 days ago

Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - Samburu moran (warrior ) from the series #withbutterfliesandwarriors - northern Kenya #kenya #northernkenya #conservation @ewasolions

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2 weeks ago

Photograph by David Chancellor- @chancellordavid - sometimes necessity is the mother of invention. Here we’re transporting a heavily sedated cheetah from Samburu National Park, northern Kenya wrapped in a mosquito net. Called at short notice to attend to a badly injured cat we decided that once sedated the safest and softest way to transport it to the hq was wrapped in the net borrowed from a villager, and sitting on the seat next to me. Sitting next to that cat snoring gently was one of the best drives I’ve had on Kenyan roads; not looking forward to duplicating the situation but definitely keen to get the driver to duplicate his driving 👍🏿👍🏼💚 #withbutterfliesandwarriors #kenya #northernkenya #conservation #cheetah 🖤❤️

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2 weeks ago

northern Kenya late rains #withbutterfliesandwarriors

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2 weeks ago

Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - a Samburu moran (warrior ) catches a cow for slaughter at dawn, northern Kenya. The Samburu are semi-nomadic pastoralists who herd mainly cattle, but also keep sheep, goats and camels. The Maasai refer to them as ‘the butterfly people’ seeing them as even more beautiful, and butterfly-like, than themselves. Their only wealth comes from their livestock, following the cycle of wet and dry seasons in order to maximise grazing. They are therefore a great barometer by which to measure both climate change, and human-wildlife conflict in this region. They have been featured widely in western culture, and yet few really know them. Dancing Samburu were included in a MasterCard commercial. Samburu runners were famously portrayed in a late 1980s Nike commercial, in which a Samburu man's words were translated into English as the Nike slogan “Just Do It.” This was corrected by anthropologist Lee Cronk, who seeing the commercial alerted Nike and the media that the Samburu man was saying “I don’t want these. Give me big shoes.” Nike, in explaining the error, admitted to having improvised the dialogue and stated “we thought nobody in America would know what he said”. It’s exactly these cultures and traditions that we should be working with and listening to if we have any chance of conserving the planet’s ecosystems and wildlife. Follow me here to see more from them over the next weeks and months #withbutterfliesandwarriors #kenya #northernkenya #conservation @natgeo @thephotosociety @everydayextinction @ewasolions

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3 weeks ago

Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - this is Latoya, he works with @ewasolions who are working to encourage coexistence between people living on community land, such as the Samburu, and all carnivores; not just lions, but also hyena, wild dog, leopard and jackals. Here in Samburu those monitoring the movement and relaying the whereabouts of carnivores are drawn from these communities. Thus, the Moran such as Latoya play a vital role here in the conservation of Kenya’s wildlife, and preservation of the pristine ecosystems that support it. This follows throughout this region of northern Kenya; community engagement is vital if wildlife and human populations are to coexist at all, particularly in as complicated an environment as this which is prone to drought, flood, and tribal conflict. This wonderful human being is not from another World, but from the same one that we all inhabit, only maybe he cares enough to preserve it, and along with that his traditions and way of life. Latoya get the chai on, I’ll see you next week, warrior 👍🏼👍🏿🖤 - follow me here @chancellordavid @thephotosociety @natgeo @everydayextinction and them here @ewasolions ❤️💚 #fightingextinction #northernkenya #kenya #carnivores #lion #leopard #wilddog #jackal #conserving #conservation #africa #withbutterfliesandwarriors 💚👍🏿👍🏼💚❤️

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3 weeks ago

Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - Mukokondo Mountains, northern Kenya - #withbutterfliesandwarriors #kenya #northernkenya #conservation @thephotosociety @natgeo @everydayextinction

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3 weeks ago

Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - Samburu Moran (warrior ) northern Kenya #kenya #northernkenya #conservation #withbutterfliesandwarriors @thephotosociety @everydayextinction @natgeo

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4 weeks ago

Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - with so many comments on the previous post I thought it best to follow up here. The reality is that the fate of wildlife lies mainly in the hands of those who live with it daily. They must be allowed to benefit from its presence on their lands. Conservation efforts that do not acknowledge this, and help them to become defenders of all wildlife, will force them into a battle from which there will be no winner. We must start recognising the rights of people coexisting with wildlife. However we must also be careful not simply to listen to those who shout the loudest. As a recent headline in Bloomberg Businessweek put it perfectly ‘elephants can’t vote, but they may well decide Botswana’s election’ - These magnificent creatures have become a powerful tool when garnering rural votes and this is wrong, and I’m appalled. We must never take our eye off the ball where wildlife and ecosystems are concerned. To many it is simply a commodity to be taken at will; many years ago it was considered inexhaustible, now it is threatened with extinction. Without due diligence species will slip into extinction and ecosystems will be lost for ever, as our eye is focused elsewhere. Africa is a complex and challenging environment on which to apply and govern legislation, but we must ensure that when applied it is not abused. It no longer falls on those of us who have the dust of Africa on our skin to protect it, but all of us need to do so, but not without fully understanding the implications of our actions. That is what my work is all about. I realise it may be abhorrent for some, but I’d ask you to stick with it as long as you can, and possibly understand a little more of the challenges we all face as the planet creaks under the weight of our presence. Thank you for supporting the work. 👍🏿👍🏼💚🖤 #withbutterfliesandwarriors #conservation #fightingextinction

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4 weeks ago

Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - training northern Kenya’s rangers in the art of camouflage 👍🏼👍🏿💚🖤 @forrangers @borana1 @lewa_wildlife @nrt_kenya #kenya #northernkenya #conservation #fightingextinction #withbutterfliesandwarriors @natgeo @thephotosociety @everydayextinction

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4 weeks ago

Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - young Samburu women, lmuget, Samburu, northern Kenya - it’s vital that we enable local people to manage their traditional lands and natural resources, as a result they are able to secure peace, protect the environment, and thus transform their own lives. Key to this is the provision of accessible and affordable healthcare and family planning. By integrating this with ecological awareness through education results in: - A decline in the numbers of unskilled abortions and infanticides due to unwanted pregnancies - Child/infant mortality decreasing; children born three to five years apart are 2.5 times more likely to survive than children born two years apart - Fewer girls drop out of school on account of unwanted pregnancies - Natural resources can be distributed more equitably; a smaller family puts less pressure on an already stressed ecosystem - Water sources remain more readily available for both human, wildlife, and livestock consumption - Degraded environments are given a better chance of recovery - Human conflict over pasture reduces - Human-wildlife conflict and poaching reduces. In addition, when women are empowered decision-makers in their families, they spend more resources on their children's nutrition, healthcare and education. Thus by improving the quality of life for these communities and as a result reducing human/wildlife population pressures, indigenous flora and fauna have a better chance to increase again and there’s a reduced risk of conflict and poaching of endangered and vulnerable species including elephant, lion, cheetah, African wild dog, Black rhino, Grevy's zebra, Hirola antelope, and others. New work in northern Kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors #northernkenya #kenya @thephotosociety @natgeo @everydayextinction #women #healthcare #conservation #fightingextinction

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4 weeks ago

Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - young Samburu women, lmuget, Samburu, northern Kenya - it’s vital that we enable local people to manage their traditional lands and natural resources, as a result they are able to secure peace, protect the environment, and thus transform their own lives. Key to this is the provision of accessible and affordable healthcare and family planning. By integrating this with ecological awareness through education results in: - A decline in the numbers of unskilled abortions and infanticides due to unwanted pregnancies - Child/infant mortality decreasing; children born three to five years apart are 2.5 times more likely to survive than children born two years apart - Fewer girls drop out of school on account of unwanted pregnancies - Natural resources can be distributed more equitably; a smaller family puts less pressure on an already stressed ecosystem - Water sources remain more readily available for both human, wildlife, and livestock consumption - Degraded environments are given a better chance of recovery - Human conflict over pasture reduces - Human-wildlife conflict and poaching reduces. In addition, when women are empowered decision-makers in their families, they spend more resources on their children's nutrition, healthcare and education. Thus by improving the quality of life for these communities and as a result reducing human/wildlife population pressures, indigenous flora and fauna have a better chance to increase again and there’s a reduced risk of conflict and poaching of endangered and vulnerable species including elephant, lion, cheetah, African wild dog, Black rhino, Grevy's zebra, Hirola antelope, and others. New work in northern Kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors #northernkenya #kenya @thephotosociety @natgeo @everydayextinction #women #healthcare #conservation #fightingextinction

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4 weeks ago

Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - a vet’s assistant covers the eyes of a tranquillised white rhino, northern Kenya - When working with wildlife requiring veterinarian intervention it’s vital that we get to tranquillised wildlife as quickly as possible. Many species are prone to overheating when unconscious. Body mass is of major concern when dealing with mega herbivores such as rhino and elephant which may die when resting unattended as body mass can restrict breathing and heart function. In some cases, they can suffocate on undigested food eaten prior to tranquillisation. It’s also vital to remove external stimulation, sight and sound, so here you’ll notice the rhino’s ears have been blocked (with the vet’s socks 😉 ), and it’s eyes are being covered. Outside stimulation can cause stress to the animal which we want to avoid at all costs. It can also snap the rhino out of unconsciousness in seconds, from being fully asleep to wide awake, which can be extremely dangerous for the vet and his team - It’s extraordinary to witness the amazing work of these individuals dedicated to preserving the planets precious wildlife. Humbled to be working with them 👍🏿👍🏼🙏🏻🖤💚 #conservation #northernkenya #kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors #fightingextinction @thephotosociety @natgeo @everydayextinction #rhino #stoppoaching

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last month

Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - dawn, northern Kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors #kenya

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last month

#Repost @karmagawa with @get_repost ・・・ ⚠WARNING GRAPHIC IMAGES⚠ Repost from @chancellordavid Vietnam is one of the world’s largest consumers of rhino horn, contributing to the continued poaching of rhinos in the wild. Last year in Africa 1,100 rhinos were killed by poachers. In 2015, the Government of Vietnam increased sanctions on the illegal trade and use of rhino horns. And, through a variety of campaigns, conservation organisations have tried to educate Vietnamese consumers about Africa’s rhino poaching crisis and the uselessness of rhino horn in medications treating various ailments including hangovers, fever, gout and potentially terminal illnesses, like cancer or stroke. Some people also gave it to terminally ill relatives to console them and show that they had done everything in their power to help them. In a recent study it was found that consumers preferred wild rhino horn over farmed rhino horn, and that they weren’t affected by stigma or concerns about rhino populations. The killing of rhinos in Africa was seen as a remote issue, something that happened far away, out of their influence because they didn’t kill the rhinos themselves. If we are to succeed at all its vital that we strive to promote behaviour change via grassroots education. We need to be clear that the demand for rhino horn is not only costing the lives of rhino, but also the lives of those who dedicate their lives to protecting them. A dead father is also extinct to his family and equally a result of their demand for rhino horn - a ranger hurries from the scene of a poaching with a freshly severed horn, at dawn a poacher lies dead his hand resting on his G3 rifle, rangers remove the horn from a poached rhino, blood drips from a police vehicle carrying bodies to the morgue - all from work in northern Kenya - #withbutterfliesandwarriors @natgeo @thephotosociety @everydayextinction #conservation #endextinction

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last month

#Repost @karmagawa Difunde y comparte por favor • • • • • ⚠WARNING GRAPHIC IMAGES⚠ Repost from @chancellordavid Vietnam is one of the world’s largest consumers of rhino horn, contributing to the continued poaching of rhinos in the wild. Last year in Africa 1,100 rhinos were killed by poachers. In 2015, the Government of Vietnam increased sanctions on the illegal trade and use of rhino horns. And, through a variety of campaigns, conservation organisations have tried to educate Vietnamese consumers about Africa’s rhino poaching crisis and the uselessness of rhino horn in medications treating various ailments including hangovers, fever, gout and potentially terminal illnesses, like cancer or stroke. Some people also gave it to terminally ill relatives to console them and show that they had done everything in their power to help them. In a recent study it was found that consumers preferred wild rhino horn over farmed rhino horn, and that they weren’t affected by stigma or concerns about rhino populations. The killing of rhinos in Africa was seen as a remote issue, something that happened far away, out of their influence because they didn’t kill the rhinos themselves. If we are to succeed at all its vital that we strive to promote behaviour change via grassroots education. We need to be clear that the demand for rhino horn is not only costing the lives of rhino, but also the lives of those who dedicate their lives to protecting them. A dead father is also extinct to his family and equally a result of their demand for rhino horn - a ranger hurries from the scene of a poaching with a freshly severed horn, at dawn a poacher lies dead his hand resting on his G3 rifle, rangers remove the horn from a poached rhino, blood drips from a police vehicle carrying bodies to the morgue - all from work in northern Kenya - #withbutterfliesandwarriors @natgeo @thephotosociety @everydayextinction #conservation #endextinction

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last month

#Repost @karmagawa • • • • • ⚠WARNING GRAPHIC IMAGES⚠ Repost from @chancellordavid Vietnam is one of the world’s largest consumers of rhino horn, contributing to the continued poaching of rhinos in the wild. Last year in Africa 1,100 rhinos were killed by poachers. In 2015, the Government of Vietnam increased sanctions on the illegal trade and use of rhino horns. And, through a variety of campaigns, conservation organisations have tried to educate Vietnamese consumers about Africa’s rhino poaching crisis and the uselessness of rhino horn in medications treating various ailments including hangovers, fever, gout and potentially terminal illnesses, like cancer or stroke. Some people also gave it to terminally ill relatives to console them and show that they had done everything in their power to help them. In a recent study it was found that consumers preferred wild rhino horn over farmed rhino horn, and that they weren’t affected by stigma or concerns about rhino populations. The killing of rhinos in Africa was seen as a remote issue, something that happened far away, out of their influence because they didn’t kill the rhinos themselves. If we are to succeed at all its vital that we strive to promote behaviour change via grassroots education. We need to be clear that the demand for rhino horn is not only costing the lives of rhino, but also the lives of those who dedicate their lives to protecting them. A dead father is also extinct to his family and equally a result of their demand for rhino horn - a ranger hurries from the scene of a poaching with a freshly severed horn, at dawn a poacher lies dead his hand resting on his G3 rifle, rangers remove the horn from a poached rhino, blood drips from a police vehicle carrying bodies to the morgue - all from work in northern Kenya - #withbutterfliesandwarriors @natgeo @thephotosociety @everydayextinction #conservation #endextinction

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last month

#Repost @karmagawa • • • • • • ⚠WARNING GRAPHIC IMAGES⚠ Repost from @chancellordavid Vietnam is one of the world’s largest consumers of rhino horn, contributing to the continued poaching of rhinos in the wild. Last year in Africa 1,100 rhinos were killed by poachers. In 2015, the Government of Vietnam increased sanctions on the illegal trade and use of rhino horns. And, through a variety of campaigns, conservation organisations have tried to educate Vietnamese consumers about Africa’s rhino poaching crisis and the uselessness of rhino horn in medications treating various ailments including hangovers, fever, gout and potentially terminal illnesses, like cancer or stroke. Some people also gave it to terminally ill relatives to console them and show that they had done everything in their power to help them. In a recent study it was found that consumers preferred wild rhino horn over farmed rhino horn, and that they weren’t affected by stigma or concerns about rhino populations. The killing of rhinos in Africa was seen as a remote issue, something that happened far away, out of their influence because they didn’t kill the rhinos themselves. If we are to succeed at all its vital that we strive to promote behaviour change via grassroots education. We need to be clear that the demand for rhino horn is not only costing the lives of rhino, but also the lives of those who dedicate their lives to protecting them. A dead father is also extinct to his family and equally a result of their demand for rhino horn - a ranger hurries from the scene of a poaching with a freshly severed horn, at dawn a poacher lies dead his hand resting on his G3 rifle, rangers remove the horn from a poached rhino, blood drips from a police vehicle carrying bodies to the morgue - all from work in northern Kenya - #withbutterfliesandwarriors @natgeo @thephotosociety @everydayextinction #conservation #endextinction

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last month

#Repost @chancellordavid with @get_repost ・・・ Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - Vietnam is one of the world’s largest consumers of rhino horn, contributing to the continued poaching of rhinos in the wild. Last year in Africa 1,100 rhinos were killed by poachers. In 2015, the Government of Vietnam increased sanctions on the illegal trade and use of rhino horns. And, through a variety of campaigns, conservation organisations have tried to educate Vietnamese consumers about Africa’s rhino poaching crisis and the uselessness of rhino horn in medications treating various ailments including hangovers, fever, gout and potentially terminal illnesses, like cancer or stroke. Some people also gave it to terminally ill relatives to console them and show that they had done everything in their power to help them. In a recent study it was found that consumers preferred wild rhino horn over farmed rhino horn, and that they weren’t affected by stigma or concerns about rhino populations. The killing of rhinos in Africa was seen as a remote issue, something that happened far away, out of their influence because they didn’t kill the rhinos themselves. If we are to succeed at all its vital that we strive to promote behaviour change via grassroots education. We need to be clear that the demand for rhino horn is not only costing the lives of rhino, but also the lives of those who dedicate their lives to protecting them. A dead father is also extinct to his family and equally a result of their demand for rhino horn - a ranger hurries from the scene of a poaching with a freshly severed horn, at dawn a poacher lies dead his hand resting on his G3 rifle, rangers remove the horn from a poached rhino, blood drips from a police vehicle carrying bodies to the morgue - all from work in northern Kenya - #withbutterfliesandwarriors @natgeo @thephotosociety @everydayextinction #conservation #endextinction

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last month

I am sharing this because I strongly believe that this is yet another piece to my healing journey. I’ve had much clarity surrounding both my emotional healing & the work I do with dōTERRA on the natural healing level. I see now that my mission & vision for where I want to continue to go is HEALING both for myself and to help empower others to do the same both emotionally & physically.⠀ ⠀ With conviction I can say my soul is being led to the work it is meant to do.⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ #womenempowerment #womensrights #canadianwomen #canadianindigeniousrights #commitee #soulswork #forsuchatimeasthis #indigenous #indigenouswomen #metis #metiswoman #ojibwe #lifespurpose #womenandgenderequality #peacefromwithin #healingjourney #naturesmedicine #naturalmedicine #doterra #doterracanada #healingenergy #withpride #wpg #prairiegirl #manitoba #niagaraonthelake #niagara #withbutterfliesandwarriors #healing #soulsjourney

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April 2019

Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Samburu lmuget (ceremony ), Sasaab village, northern Kenya. At dawn Samburu moran (warriors ) celebrate their coming of age; livestock is ceremonially sacrificed and the moran join together to celebrate the passage of their time as warriors. @ewasolions is dedicated to conserving lions and other large carnivores by promoting coexistence between people and wildlife, working hand in hand with local communities to provide education, training, and improved conservation practices. The African lion population has declined by 43% in the last 20 years, and lions now occupy only 8% of their historical range. In Kenya the population now numbers less than 2,000 individuals. At current rates of decline, the species could become extinct here within the next two decades. To see more work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid and @ewasolions #conserving #northernkenya #kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors

160
March 2019

Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Samburu lmuget (ceremony ), Sasaab village, northern Kenya. At dawn Samburu moran (warriors ) celebrate their coming of age; livestock is ceremonially sacrificed and the moran join together to celebrate the passage of their time as warriors. @ewasolions is dedicated to conserving lions and other large carnivores by promoting coexistence between people and wildlife, working hand in hand with local communities to provide education, training, and improved conservation practices. The African lion population has declined by 43% in the last 20 years, and lions now occupy only 8% of their historical range. In Kenya the population now numbers less than 2,000 individuals. At current rates of decline, the species could become extinct here within the next two decades. To see more work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid and @ewasolions #conserving #northernkenya #kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors

630
March 2019

Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Samburu lmuget (ceremony ), Sasaab village, northern Kenya. At dawn Samburu moran (warriors ) celebrate their coming of age; livestock is ceremonially sacrificed and the moran join together to celebrate the passage of their time as warriors. @ewasolions is dedicated to conserving lions and other large carnivores by promoting coexistence between people and wildlife, working hand in hand with local communities to provide education, training, and improved conservation practices. The African lion population has declined by 43% in the last 20 years, and lions now occupy only 8% of their historical range. In Kenya the population now numbers less than 2,000 individuals. At current rates of decline, the species could become extinct here within the next two decades. To see more work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid and @ewasolions #conserving #northernkenya #kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors

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March 2019

Jangan lupa Like, Komen & Share , Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Samburu lmuget (ceremony ), Sasaab village, northern Kenya. At dawn Samburu moran (warriors ) celebrate their coming of age; livestock is ceremonially sacrificed and the moran join together to celebrate the passage of their time as warriors. @ewasolions is dedicated to conserving lions and other large carnivores by promoting coexistence between people and wildlife, working hand in hand with local communities to provide education, training, and improved conservation practices. The African lion population has declined by 43% in the last 20 years, and lions now occupy only 8% of their historical range. In Kenya the population now numbers less than 2,000 individuals. At current rates of decline, the species could become extinct here within the next two decades. To see more work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid and @ewasolions #conserving #northernkenya #kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors #Discovery #discoverychannel #discoveryindonesia #nationalgeographic #natgeo #natgeoindonesia #nationalgeographic id

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March 2019

#Repost @natgeo • • • • • • Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Samburu lmuget (ceremony ), Sasaab village, northern Kenya. At dawn Samburu moran (warriors ) celebrate their coming of age; livestock is ceremonially sacrificed and the moran join together to celebrate the passage of their time as warriors. @ewasolions is dedicated to conserving lions and other large carnivores by promoting coexistence between people and wildlife, working hand in hand with local communities to provide education, training, and improved conservation practices. The African lion population has declined by 43% in the last 20 years, and lions now occupy only 8% of their historical range. In Kenya the population now numbers less than 2,000 individuals. At current rates of decline, the species could become extinct here within the next two decades. To see more work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid and @ewasolions #conserving #northernkenya #kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors

151
March 2019

Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Samburu lmuget (ceremony ), Sasaab village, northern Kenya. At dawn Samburu moran (warriors ) celebrate their coming of age; livestock is ceremonially sacrificed and the moran join together to celebrate the passage of their time as warriors. @ewasolions is dedicated to conserving lions and other large carnivores by promoting coexistence between people and wildlife, working hand in hand with local communities to provide education, training, and improved conservation practices. The African lion population has declined by 43% in the last 20 years, and lions now occupy only 8% of their historical range. In Kenya the population now numbers less than 2,000 individuals. At current rates of decline, the species could become extinct here within the next two decades. To see more work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid and @ewasolions #conserving #northernkenya #kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors

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March 2019

First of all turn the sound up - Sand storm in the camp, hopefully ahead of rain, northern Kenya - So this is from @ewasolions who I’ve talked about often. I adore their work, it’s vital, powerful, and of huge global significance, and yet also so important at community level - I’ll be closely cooperating with them on a project over the next months and this gives an idea of the climatic issues faced in this extraordinary corner of the planet. Follow my journey here @chancellordavid and their amazing work @ewasolions - and this when the African lion population has declined by 43% in the last 20 years and lions now occupy only 8% of their historical range in Africa. The estimated numbers of lions across Africa are approximately 20,000. In Kenya, the national population now numbers less than 2,000 individuals. At current rates of decline, the species could become extinct here within the next two decades. This reduction in lion numbers is primarily due to habitat loss and conflict with humans, typically when lions kill people’s livestock. Lions and other large carnivores are wide-ranging species, and designated protected areas are often not large enough to ensure their long-term survival. It is crucial, therefore, that conservation of these species, as well as their prey, is addressed throughout the landscape, which not only incorporates protected areas, but also the surrounding areas where local people live. @ewasolions is dedicated to conserving lions and other large carnivores by promoting co-existence between people and wildlife, they work hand-in-hand with local communities to provide education, training and improved conservation practices that help people and wildlife, using sound science to help guide the long-term conservation of lions across community conservancies and protected areas in northern Kenya, and I love their work 👍🏿👍🏼💚❤️ #conserving #withbutterfliesandwarriors @thephotosociety @everydayextinction @natgeo

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February 2019

Protect what U Love . . Benefit. Butterflies with no borders. . #butterflies #withbutterfliesandwarriors #texasborder #riogrande #carrizo #benefit #lapulga

350
February 2019

Posted @withrepost@natgeo Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is the extraordinary Katie Rowe communicating with an orphan baby elephant. Without its mother, orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant, it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it; that done, it will remember you forever and you will never be strangers again. It's a bond established at @r.e.s.c.u.e Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy in Samburu, northern Kenya, home to the first community-owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy Bastard several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub plane, we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range. I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, while creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving, and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephants cared for by the Samburu community are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e #withbutterfliesandwarriors

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February 2019

Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is the extraordinary Katie Rowe communicating with an orphan baby elephant. Without its mother, orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant, it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it; that done, it will remember you forever and you will never be strangers again. It's a bond established at @r.e.s.c.u.e Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy in Samburu, northern Kenya, home to the first community-owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy Bastard several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub plane, we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range. I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, while creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving, and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephants cared for by the Samburu community are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e #withbutterfliesandwarriors #nationalgeographic #animals #beautiful #world #woman #respect

6150
February 2019

I absolutely LOVE #elephants and this picture just makes me melt 😩😻💗 . Posted @withrepost@natgeo Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is the extraordinary Katie Rowe communicating with an orphan baby elephant. Without its mother, orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant, it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it; that done, it will remember you forever and you will never be strangers again. It's a bond established at @r.e.s.c.u.e Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy in Samburu, northern Kenya, home to the first community-owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy Bastard several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub plane, we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range. I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, while creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving, and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephants cared for by the Samburu community are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e #withbutterfliesandwarriors

131
February 2019

#Repost @natgeo ・・・ Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is the extraordinary Katie Rowe communicating with an orphan baby elephant. Without its mother, orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant, it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it; that done, it will remember you forever and you will never be strangers again. It's a bond established at @r.e.s.c.u.e Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy in Samburu, northern Kenya, home to the first community-owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy Bastard several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub plane, we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range. I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, while creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving, and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephants cared for by the Samburu community are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e #withbutterfliesandwarriors

111
February 2019

Restless, northern Kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors

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February 2019

#Repost @natgeo • • • • • Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is the extraordinary Katie Rowe communicating with an orphan baby elephant. Without its mother, orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant, it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it; that done, it will remember you forever and you will never be strangers again. It's a bond established at @r.e.s.c.u.e Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy in Samburu, northern Kenya, home to the first community-owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy Bastard several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub plane, we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range. I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, while creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving, and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephants cared for by the Samburu community are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e #withbutterfliesandwarriors

50
February 2019

#Repost @natgeo • • • • • Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is the extraordinary Katie Rowe communicating with an orphan baby elephant. Without its mother, orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant, it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it; that done, it will remember you forever and you will never be strangers again. It's a bond established at @r.e.s.c.u.e Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy in Samburu, northern Kenya, home to the first community-owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy Bastard several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub plane, we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range. I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, while creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving, and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephants cared for by the Samburu community are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e #withbutterfliesandwarriors

100
February 2019

great... now my dumb ass is gonna actively seek out baby elephants so I can blow my hot ass breath in their trunks.... smh #Repost @natgeo ( @get_repost ) ・・・ Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is the extraordinary Katie Rowe communicating with an orphan baby elephant. Without its mother, orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant, it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it; that done, it will remember you forever and you will never be strangers again. It's a bond established at @r.e.s.c.u.e Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy in Samburu, northern Kenya, home to the first community-owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy Bastard several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub plane, we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range. I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, while creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving, and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephants cared for by the Samburu community are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e #withbutterfliesandwarriors

10
February 2019

#Repost @natgeo ・・・ Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is the extraordinary Katie Rowe communicating with an orphan baby elephant. Without its mother, orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant, it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it; that done, it will remember you forever and you will never be strangers again. It's a bond established at @r.e.s.c.u.e Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy in Samburu, northern Kenya, home to the first community-owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy Bastard several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub plane, we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range. I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, while creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving, and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephants cared for by the Samburu community are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e #withbutterfliesandwarriors

110
February 2019

Bucket list goal: meet a baby elephant, pray it lifts its trunk up to me, establish a life long friendship 😍 #Repost @natgeo with @get_repost ・・・ Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is the extraordinary Katie Rowe communicating with an orphan baby elephant. Without its mother, orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant, it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it; that done, it will remember you forever and you will never be strangers again. It's a bond established at @r.e.s.c.u.e Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy in Samburu, northern Kenya, home to the first community-owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy Bastard several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub plane, we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range. I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, while creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving, and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephants cared for by the Samburu community are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e #withbutterfliesandwarriors

132
February 2019

#Repost @natgeo • • • • • Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | This is the extraordinary Katie Rowe communicating with an orphan baby elephant. Without its mother, orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant, it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it; that done, it will remember you forever and you will never be strangers again. It's a bond established at @r.e.s.c.u.e Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy in Samburu, northern Kenya, home to the first community-owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy Bastard several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub plane, we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range. I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, while creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving, and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephants cared for by the Samburu community are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e #withbutterfliesandwarriors

80
February 2019

It just makes me sick to my stomach seeing and reading horrifying stories and testaments about poaching such beautiful creatures. Poachers harm these animals just for profit? God bless those who dedicate their lives in order to protect them. It just heartbreaking to see this over and over. We need to change. #Repost @thephotosociety with @get_repost ・・・ Photograph by David Chancellor - I think it might be worth posting this, I suggest many might not want to go past the first frame in the carousel. I’ve worked in Kenya for many years now and on this occasion I was working on elephant poaching that had seriously spiked. If you imagine the scene - we had raced at breakneck speed across appalling terrain in response to the sound of gunshots. We arrived just after sunset and my main concern was that we were loosing light. We found a ranger who was on foot and walked to the rough location of the shot. What hit me first was a smell from my youth whilst working part time in a butchers shop, it stopped me dead in my tracks and transported me to another place years ago. In front of me I could see a sleeping elephant, it was incredibly calm, and yet I could smell meat. As we slowly moved forwards we could see it wasn’t breathing; we still weren’t aware if those responsible for the gunshot were there, or not. Then it became obvious that in front of me was a trunk, a severed trunk. We froze. Often poachers will cut the face from the elephant inc tusk and trunk, fled the scene and remove the ivory away from the incident. I still couldn’t work out why the sleeping elephant was there, and where was the poached one ? As I moved around to the front of the elephant I literately slumped onto my knees. The tranquil scene was now one of utter brutality. I will never forget this scene. Nor will I forget those who work to stop this, and those who take in the orphans from such events. I love elephants, they continue to reduce me to tears in so many ways, most often laughter, occasionally not. Keep engaged. Keep them alive 👍🏿👍🏼🐘💚❤️ follow me @chancellordavid #fightingextinction #withbutterfliesandwarriors

10
February 2019

Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - this is the extraordinary Katie Rowe @katie rowe communicating with an orphan baby elephant. Without its mother orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it, that done, it will remember you forever, you will never be strangers again, a bond of trust is established @r.e.s.c.u.e - Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy, Samburu, northern Kenya is home to the first community owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub; we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range, I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to Rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, whilst creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, The Reteti Elephant Sanctuary, is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephant that are cared for by the Samburu community, are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment, that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods, and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e #withbutterfliesandwarriors

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February 2019

Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - an orphaned baby elephant scuttles across an arid landscape, Tanzania - it’s often only when you come across images like this that you realise the extraordinary survival challenges faced by wildlife in these magnificent but challenging landscapes. Without its mother orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it, that done, it will remember you forever, you will never be strangers again, a bond of trust is established @r.e.s.c.u.e - Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy, Samburu, northern Kenya is home to the first community owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub; we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range, I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to Rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, whilst creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, The Reteti Elephant Sanctuary, is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephant that are cared for by the Samburu community, are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment, that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods, and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e #withbutterfliesandwarriors

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February 2019

Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - this is ‘andou’ a new arrival @r.e.s.c.u.e having a doze on the warm soil after a first feed - Without its mother orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it, that done, it will remember you forever, you will never be strangers again, a bond of trust is established @r.e.s.c.u.e - Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy, Samburu, northern Kenya is home to the first community owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub; we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range, I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to Rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, whilst creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, The Reteti Elephant Sanctuary, is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephant that are cared for by the Samburu community, are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment, that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods, and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e #withbutterfliesandwarriors

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February 2019

Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - this is the extraordinary Katie Rowe @katie rowe communicating with an orphan baby elephant. Without its mother orphaned baby elephants can only survive a few days in the wild. When first meeting a baby elephant it will lift up its trunk and expects you to blow into it, that done, it will remember you forever, you will never be strangers again, a bond of trust is established @r.e.s.c.u.e - Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy, Samburu, northern Kenya is home to the first community owned elephant orphanage in Africa. I flew over this extraordinary landscape with Jeremy several years ago. Sitting behind him in his Super Cub; we’d left before dawn to shoot landscapes of the Mathews Range, I listened to him talk excitedly about his and Katie’s plans for this incredible place. Designed to Rescue and release orphaned and abandoned elephant calves, whilst creating much needed benefits to the local people that live alongside them, The Reteti Elephant Sanctuary, is the finest representation of the communities of this region standing up united for wildlife, in recognition of the value that they can cultivate. Opportunities are being created, livelihoods are improving and wildlife is returning, proving that nature can provide a sustainable economy for the populations that occupy its magnificent ecosystem. The orphaned elephant that are cared for by the Samburu community, are symbols of a new wave of thinking about wildlife and the environment, that goes far beyond traditional conservation methods, and dives deeper into the core value of what nature represents. Humbled and inspired to see what they’ve achieved here. Follow their work here @r.e.s.c.u.e #withbutterfliesandwarriors

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December 2018

Jangan lupa Like, Komen & Share , Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Here in northern Kenya by enabling local people to manage their traditional lands and natural resources they are able to secure peace, protect the environment, and thus transform their lives. Key to this is the provision of accessible and affordable healthcare and family planning; integrating this, and a strong component of ecological awareness through education results in: - The numbers of unskilled abortions and infanticides due to unwanted pregnancies declining. - Child/infant mortality declining; children born three to five years apart are 2.5 times more likely to survive than children born two years apart. - Fewer girls drop out of school on account of unwanted pregnancies. - Natural resources can be distributed more equitably; a smaller family puts less pressure on an already stressed ecosystem. - Water sources remain plentiful for both human, wildlife, and livestock consumption. - Degraded environments are given a chance to recover. - Human conflict over pasture reduces. - Human-wildlife conflict and poaching reduces. In addition, when women are empowered decision-makers in their families, they spend more resources on their children's nutrition, healthcare and education. Involving men in family planning can lead to changes in gender norms. Thus by improving the quality of life of these communities and as a result reducing human/wildlife population pressures, indigenous flora and fauna are able to thrive and there’s a reduced risk of conflict and poaching to endangered and vulnerable species such as elephant, lion, cheetah, African wild dog, Black rhino, Grevy's zebra, Hirola antelope, and countless others - Kenya’s human population is currently increasing by approximately one million every year. To see more work and projects follow me @chancellordavid #withbutterfliesandwarriors #Discovery #discoverychannel #discoveryindonesia #nationalgeographic #natgeo #natgeoindonesia #nationalgeographic id

200
December 2018

#repost from @natgeo Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Here in northern Kenya by enabling local people to manage their traditional lands and natural resources they are able to secure peace, protect the environment, and thus transform their lives. Key to this is the provision of accessible and affordable healthcare and family planning; integrating this, and a strong component of ecological awareness through education results in: - The numbers of unskilled abortions and infanticides due to unwanted pregnancies declining. - Child/infant mortality declining; children born three to five years apart are 2.5 times more likely to survive than children born two years apart. - Fewer girls drop out of school on account of unwanted pregnancies. - Natural resources can be distributed more equitably; a smaller family puts less pressure on an already stressed ecosystem. - Water sources remain plentiful for both human, wildlife, and livestock consumption. - Degraded environments are given a chance to recover. - Human conflict over pasture reduces. - Human-wildlife conflict and poaching reduces. In addition, when women are empowered decision-makers in their families, they spend more resources on their children's nutrition, healthcare and education. Involving men in family planning can lead to changes in gender norms. Thus by improving the quality of life of these communities and as a result reducing human/wildlife population pressures, indigenous flora and fauna are able to thrive and there’s a reduced risk of conflict and poaching to endangered and vulnerable species such as elephant, lion, cheetah, African wild dog, Black rhino, Grevy's zebra, Hirola antelope, and countless others - Kenya’s human population is currently increasing by approximately one million every year. To see more work and projects follow me @chancellordavid #withbutterfliesandwarriors

50
December 2018

#Repost @natgeo ・・・ Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Here in northern Kenya by enabling local people to manage their traditional lands and natural resources they are able to secure peace, protect the environment, and thus transform their lives. Key to this is the provision of accessible and affordable healthcare and family planning; integrating this, and a strong component of ecological awareness through education results in: - The numbers of unskilled abortions and infanticides due to unwanted pregnancies declining. - Child/infant mortality declining; children born three to five years apart are 2.5 times more likely to survive than children born two years apart. - Fewer girls drop out of school on account of unwanted pregnancies. - Natural resources can be distributed more equitably; a smaller family puts less pressure on an already stressed ecosystem. - Water sources remain plentiful for both human, wildlife, and livestock consumption. - Degraded environments are given a chance to recover. - Human conflict over pasture reduces. - Human-wildlife conflict and poaching reduces. In addition, when women are empowered decision-makers in their families, they spend more resources on their children's nutrition, healthcare and education. Involving men in family planning can lead to changes in gender norms. Thus by improving the quality of life of these communities and as a result reducing human/wildlife population pressures, indigenous flora and fauna are able to thrive and there’s a reduced risk of conflict and poaching to endangered and vulnerable species such as elephant, lion, cheetah, African wild dog, Black rhino, Grevy's zebra, Hirola antelope, and countless others - Kenya’s human population is currently increasing by approximately one million every year. To see more work and projects follow me @chancellordavid #withbutterfliesandwarriors

120
December 2018

Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Here in northern Kenya by enabling local people to manage their traditional lands and natural resources they are able to secure peace, protect the environment, and thus transform their lives. Key to this is the provision of accessible and affordable healthcare and family planning; integrating this, and a strong component of ecological awareness through education results in: - The numbers of unskilled abortions and infanticides due to unwanted pregnancies declining. - Child/infant mortality declining; children born three to five years apart are 2.5 times more likely to survive than children born two years apart. - Fewer girls drop out of school on account of unwanted pregnancies. - Natural resources can be distributed more equitably; a smaller family puts less pressure on an already stressed ecosystem. - Water sources remain plentiful for both human, wildlife, and livestock consumption. - Degraded environments are given a chance to recover. - Human conflict over pasture reduces. - Human-wildlife conflict and poaching reduces. In addition, when women are empowered decision-makers in their families, they spend more resources on their children's nutrition, healthcare and education. Involving men in family planning can lead to changes in gender norms. Thus by improving the quality of life of these communities and as a result reducing human/wildlife population pressures, indigenous flora and fauna are able to thrive and there’s a reduced risk of conflict and poaching to endangered and vulnerable species such as elephant, lion, cheetah, African wild dog, Black rhino, Grevy's zebra, Hirola antelope, and countless others - Kenya’s human population is currently increasing by approximately one million every year. To see more work and projects follow me @chancellordavid #withbutterfliesandwarriors

185.1k586
December 2018

Here in northern Kenya by enabling local people to manage their traditional lands and natural resources they are able to secure peace, protect the environment, and thus transform their lives. Key to this is the provision of accessible and affordable healthcare and family planning; integrating this, and a strong component of ecological awareness through education results in: - The numbers of unskilled abortions and infanticides due to unwanted pregnancies declining. - Child/infant mortality declining; children born three to five years apart are 2.5 times more likely to survive than children born two years apart. - Fewer girls drop out of school on account of unwanted pregnancies. - Natural resources can be distributed more equitably; a smaller family puts less pressure on an already stressed ecosystem. - Water sources remain plentiful for both human, wildlife, and livestock consumption. - Degraded environments are given a chance to recover. - Human conflict over pasture reduces. - Human-wildlife conflict and poaching reduces. In addition, when women are empowered decision-makers in their families, they spend more resources on their children's nutrition, healthcare and education. Involving men in family planning can lead to changes in gender norms. Thus by improving the quality of life of these communities and as a result reducing human/wildlife population pressures, indigenous flora and fauna are able to thrive and there’s a reduced risk of conflict and poaching to endangered and vulnerable species such as elephant, lion, cheetah, African wild dog, Black rhino, Grevy's zebra, Hirola antelope, and countless others - Kenya’s human population is currently increasing by approximately one million every year. #withbutterfliesandwarriors

4.3k55
September 2018

via @natgeo ・・・ Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Camouflage warrior training, northern Kenya - from 'with butterflies and warriors' - ranger recruits are selected from all tribes across northern Kenya thus allowing ranger teams to protect wildlife and people without fear of tribal conflict. The recruits are portrayed at the end of a days camouflage and ambush training. They are carrying sticks that represent the actual weapons that they will be issued with once their training is complete and they have attained Kenya Police Reservist status, then can then operate alongside other rangers protecting wildlife and people here in northern Kenya. It is obvious that without the support and agreement of those who live alongside wildlife to safeguard a wide range of species, not just the iconic ones, we have no hope of preserving this region, let alone the rest of the planet. This is living 'with butterflies and warriors’...an ongoing project in the rangelands of northern Kenya - To see more of this project and other work, follow me here @chancellordavid @everydayextinction @thephotosociety @natgeo #withbutterfliesandwarriors #kenya #northernkenya #samburu #wildlife

1620
September 2018

Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Camouflage warrior training, northern Kenya - from 'with butterflies and warriors' - ranger recruits are selected from all tribes across northern Kenya thus allowing ranger teams to protect wildlife and people without fear of tribal conflict. The recruits are portrayed at the end of a days camouflage and ambush training. They are carrying sticks that represent the actual weapons that they will be issued with once their training is complete and they have attained Kenya Police Reservist status, then can then operate alongside other rangers protecting wildlife and people here in northern Kenya. It is obvious that without the support and agreement of those who live alongside wildlife to safeguard a wide range of species, not just the iconic ones, we have no hope of preserving this region, let alone the rest of the planet. This is living 'with butterflies and warriors’...an ongoing project in the rangelands of northern Kenya - To see more of this project and other work, follow me here @chancellordavid @everydayextinction @thephotosociety @natgeo #withbutterfliesandwarriors #kenya #northernkenya #samburu #wildlife

90
September 2018

butterfly people - the wonderful ladies of the Samburu, northern Kenya - #withbutterfliesandwarriors - work in progress ❤️🦋

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June 2018

#Repost @natgeo ・・・ Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talking with a blind black rhino calf Nicky @lewa_wildlife northern Kenya - “I’ve always felt that Sir David Attenborough is part of my family, an uncle maybe, who travelled the World bringing stories of other Worlds to us. He’d talk to us through that magic window, presenting us with all manner of marvellous creatures seemingly known only to him. Many years, and a lifetime later, I found myself sitting in a Land Rover listening to that voice of reason; we all know and understand far more of the world thanks to Sir David. A world that has changed immeasurably, but the man remains constant, a bright light that we should all follow. It’s clear to me that If we do not lead by example and teach our children that it’s not our God given right to take what we want, when we want, then there is little hope for the myriad of creatures who inhabitant this planet alongside us. We must lead by example. Their World is no longer their own, infinite can no longer be used in Africa or elsewhere, animals are finite - with Sir David Attenborough 'Africa’ for the @bbc - to see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid @natgeo @thephotosociety and @everydayextinction #davidattenborough #blackrhino #northernkenya #conserving #conservation #withbutterfliesandwarriors #northernkenya #fightingextinction

100
June 2018

Isn't this the truth? 💜 #Repost @natgeo • • • Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talking with a blind black rhino calf Nicky @lewa_wildlife northern Kenya - “I’ve always felt that Sir David Attenborough is part of my family, an uncle maybe, who travelled the World bringing stories of other Worlds to us. He’d talk to us through that magic window, presenting us with all manner of marvellous creatures seemingly known only to him. Many years, and a lifetime later, I found myself sitting in a Land Rover listening to that voice of reason; we all know and understand far more of the world thanks to Sir David. A world that has changed immeasurably, but the man remains constant, a bright light that we should all follow. It’s clear to me that If we do not lead by example and teach our children that it’s not our God given right to take what we want, when we want, then there is little hope for the myriad of creatures who inhabitant this planet alongside us. We must lead by example. Their World is no longer their own, infinite can no longer be used in Africa or elsewhere, animals are finite - with Sir David Attenborough 'Africa’ for the @bbc - to see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid @natgeo @thephotosociety and @everydayextinction #davidattenborough #blackrhino #northernkenya #conserving #conservation #withbutterfliesandwarriors #northernkenya #fightingextinction

130
June 2018

What a hero! #Repost from @natgeo Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talking with a blind black rhino calf Nicky @lewa_wildlife northern Kenya - “I’ve always felt that Sir David Attenborough is part of my family, an uncle maybe, who travelled the World bringing stories of other Worlds to us. He’d talk to us through that magic window, presenting us with all manner of marvellous creatures seemingly known only to him. Many years, and a lifetime later, I found myself sitting in a Land Rover listening to that voice of reason; we all know and understand far more of the world thanks to Sir David. A world that has changed immeasurably, but the man remains constant, a bright light that we should all follow. It’s clear to me that If we do not lead by example and teach our children that it’s not our God given right to take what we want, when we want, then there is little hope for the myriad of creatures who inhabitant this planet alongside us. We must lead by example. Their World is no longer their own, infinite can no longer be used in Africa or elsewhere, animals are finite - with Sir David Attenborough 'Africa’ for the @bbc - to see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid @natgeo @thephotosociety and @everydayextinction #davidattenborough #blackrhino #northernkenya #conserving #conservation #withbutterfliesandwarriors #northernkenya #fightingextinction

1069
June 2018

#Repost @natgeo ・・・ Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talking with a blind black rhino calf Nicky @lewa_wildlife northern Kenya - “I’ve always felt that Sir David Attenborough is part of my family, an uncle maybe, who travelled the World bringing stories of other Worlds to us. He’d talk to us through that magic window, presenting us with all manner of marvellous creatures seemingly known only to him. Many years, and a lifetime later, I found myself sitting in a Land Rover listening to that voice of reason; we all know and understand far more of the world thanks to Sir David. A world that has changed immeasurably, but the man remains constant, a bright light that we should all follow. It’s clear to me that If we do not lead by example and teach our children that it’s not our God given right to take what we want, when we want, then there is little hope for the myriad of creatures who inhabitant this planet alongside us. We must lead by example. Their World is no longer their own, infinite can no longer be used in Africa or elsewhere, animals are finite - with Sir David Attenborough 'Africa’ for the @bbc - to see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid @natgeo @thephotosociety and @everydayextinction #davidattenborough #blackrhino #northernkenya #conserving #conservation #withbutterfliesandwarriors #northernkenya #fightingextinction

100
June 2018

#Repost @natgeo ( @get_repost ) ・・・ Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talking with a blind black rhino calf Nicky @lewa_wildlife northern Kenya - “I’ve always felt that Sir David Attenborough is part of my family, an uncle maybe, who travelled the World bringing stories of other Worlds to us. He’d talk to us through that magic window, presenting us with all manner of marvellous creatures seemingly known only to him. Many years, and a lifetime later, I found myself sitting in a Land Rover listening to that voice of reason; we all know and understand far more of the world thanks to Sir David. A world that has changed immeasurably, but the man remains constant, a bright light that we should all follow. It’s clear to me that If we do not lead by example and teach our children that it’s not our God given right to take what we want, when we want, then there is little hope for the myriad of creatures who inhabitant this planet alongside us. We must lead by example. Their World is no longer their own, infinite can no longer be used in Africa or elsewhere, animals are finite - with Sir David Attenborough 'Africa’ for the @bbc - to see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid @natgeo @thephotosociety and @everydayextinction #davidattenborough #blackrhino #northernkenya #conserving #conservation #withbutterfliesandwarriors #northernkenya #fightingextinction

330
June 2018

Huge fan of Sir David! 😇💜💜😇 #Repost @natgeo ( @get_repost ) ・・・ Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of Sir David Attenborough talking with a blind black rhino calf Nicky @lewa_wildlife northern Kenya - “I’ve always felt that Sir David Attenborough is part of my family, an uncle maybe, who travelled the World bringing stories of other Worlds to us. He’d talk to us through that magic window, presenting us with all manner of marvellous creatures seemingly known only to him. Many years, and a lifetime later, I found myself sitting in a Land Rover listening to that voice of reason; we all know and understand far more of the world thanks to Sir David. A world that has changed immeasurably, but the man remains constant, a bright light that we should all follow. It’s clear to me that If we do not lead by example and teach our children that it’s not our God given right to take what we want, when we want, then there is little hope for the myriad of creatures who inhabitant this planet alongside us. We must lead by example. Their World is no longer their own, infinite can no longer be used in Africa or elsewhere, animals are finite - with Sir David Attenborough 'Africa’ for the @bbc - to see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid @natgeo @thephotosociety and @everydayextinction #davidattenborough #blackrhino #northernkenya #conserving #conservation #withbutterfliesandwarriors #northernkenya #fightingextinction

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