Photos Of Britain 🇬🇧 @photosofbritain

💂🏻‍♀️Founded and stories by @timholt 🇬🇧UK images, facts & history daily 📷Follow & tag us to be featured! 🏕Love the English Countryside? Follow below!

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Photos Of Britain 🇬🇧 photos and videos

4 days ago

Anyone else secretly love a spot of gothic mood, rainy streets and a warm coffee shop to view folk passing by? This shot of Castlehill in Edinburgh perfectly sums up the weather in Britain over the past 24 hours! 🌧 Love this by @wojtek mika . Blimey, yesterday I was even wearing my thick winter jumper! It was one of those days where the rain just didn’t stop. Steady, not too hard rain, gently soaking you like the tongue on a friendly dog. A prewash before Autumn falls. . The very gothic looking Castehill was first recorded in text around 1484 and is thought to be one of the oldest parts of Edinburgh Old Town. Pretty sure this is where the Death Eaters live. This steep and narrow road forms the summit of Edinburgh’s historic Royal Mile, where, at its end, opens into the esplanade before the Edinburgh castle. . The route of the Royal Mile follows the ridge of volcanic rock which once flowed from the nearby volcano, and was shaped by a glacier which moved across the area during the last ice age, approximately 10,000 years ago. Around the last time we had a sunny day 🤓 . Have a lovely Saturday! Super shot by @wojtek mika 🇬🇧 To be featured, follow and tag us 🇬🇧

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4 days ago

Question: How many hours of sleep do you get a night on average? Me? 6! 😳 Could I be quaffing too much tea and coffee? This shot of gorgeous Knaresborough, North Yorkshire has done the rounds a bit but I have to feature as it’s so bloomin’ lovely! Photo by @the_yorkshire_tourist Perhaps it’s the noisy stormy weather waking me. They say a months worth a rain is due to fall on Britain today. Oh to be wrapped up warm here near those gorgeous glowing lamps. Maybe that’s it for Summer 2019 in the U.K. - the first trees are just starting to turn in Cheshire 🍂 . Here, behind the main High Street, lies a charming Market Square and a warren of cobbled streets and stone staircases which weave their way up and down the hill. Built in the gorge of the River Nidd, the picturesque town spills down the riverbank while towering above are the ruins of Knaresborough Castle and of course the iconic viaduct pictured towering above the boaters. The castle itself was first built by a Norman baron in c. 1100AD on a cliff above the River Nidd (We are the knights that go Nidd! ) . There is documentary evidence dating from 1130 referring to works carried out at the castle by Henry I. In the 1170s Hugh de Moreville and his followers took refuge there after assassinating Thomas Becket. Other things to see include St Roberts Cave (dating from the Middle Ages ) and the intriguing "Ye Oldest Chymist Shoppe in England" which opened in 1720 - and is still open for business today. . Have a brilliant Friday! Great shot by @the_yorkshire_tourist 🇬🇧 Want your Photos of Britain to be featured? Follow and tag us! ‘Ta! 🇬🇧

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6 days ago

Would you rather escape to the country or stay in the city? 🤔 Ahhh...that rickety wonky stile..the traditional stone wall.. the ripples of ancient Derbyshire below.. how beautiful is the English countryside! Love this from atop of Winnats Pass by  @Ian explores . That "ripple" of the land below has an incredible story to tell! This limestone valley was once under a tropical sea - the limestone is choc full of fossils of sea creatures which lived here over 350 million years ago. The valley was created by melting glaciers wearing away the rock – the limestone gradually dissolved and streams flowed through and under cracks and fissures in the rock. One of these streams created a large underground cave system which eventually collapsed, leaving the steep-sided valley you can see today. The best bit - you can drive through it (or cycle, if you are very brave! ) . Head over to  @peak district for more shots from the Peak District! Every new follower on that page gets a complimentary half nibbled Eccles cake. . This is also a special place in Britain as the Peak District National Park became the first national park in the United Kingdom in 1951. Although for many years before this it wasn't legal to access much of the English countryside. It took a "mass trespass" of nearby Kinder Scout on 24 April 1932 before the law was eventually changed some years later. According to the Kinder Trespass website, this act of civil disobedience was one of the most successful in British history. Though controversial when it occurred, it has been interpreted as the embodiment of "working class struggle for the right to roam versus the rights of the wealthy to have exclusive use of moorlands." - Power to the people! . Have a lovely Thursday! Super shot by  @Ian explores 🇬🇧 Want to be featured? Follow and tag us. 'Ta! 🇬🇧

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1 weeks ago

Cobbles, cottages, Yorkshire Tea and a perfect little snicket! Good morning from Robin Hood's Bay, Yorkshire ☕️ Love this by @carolines_travelling_camera A snicket, in case you were wondering, is an northern English term for a narrow passage between houses..an alleyway. Sound quite Harry Potterish doesn’t it? Love this little backstreet with the mixture of old cobbles, cottages and steps. . Robin Hood’s Bay is a glorious small fishing village and bay located within the North York Moors National Park, five miles south of Whitby and 15 miles north of Scarborough on the coast of North Yorkshire, England. . Over a thousand years ago, the village and the surrounding area of Fylingdales were very much a closed community as it was so cut off. Because of this, many of the inhabitants to this day are direct descendants of the original Viking raiders who settled here to farm and fish around 850AD. So if you see any locals wearing horned helmets, screaming and throwing axes as you order tea and crumpets, you know why. . The Vikings even managed to secure two of the days of the week—Thursday – “Thor’s Day” and Tuesday – from “Tiw’s Da.” (He was the god of single combat, and law and justice in Norse mythology ) . Have a super day! Lovely shot by @carolines_travelling_camera 🇬🇧 To be featured - follow and tag us! ‘Ta! 🇬🇧

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2 weeks ago

I’m popping the kettle on - tea or coffee this morning? ☕️ Good morning from Dorset, England - And what a cracking view this is! This is Corfe Castle village, which is overlooked by the outstanding ruins of its castle perched on a hill in a gap in the Purbeck Ridge. Love this by @jan_mewald Ohhh I love the glow of the street lights, illuminating the sleepy village down below. Bliss. And as for history, this place has oodles! Burial mounds in the area show that Corfe Castle was settled as early as 6,000 BC. There was certainly a Roman presence here, but Corfe really rose in status under Alfred the Great, when he built a castle to deter Danish invaders. Sadly it didn’t quite work - we still eat delicious Lurpak butter to this day 😋 . The parish church of St Edward stands across from the castle, reputedly on the site of the cottage where the body of Edward the Martyr (King of England from 975AD until he was murdered in 978AD ) was taken following his murder. The church tower dates from the 13th century whilst the Castle itself, built in 1086, was one of the country’s great strongholds. Isn’t it amazing? So much history below us! . Sadly the very naughty parliamentarians destroyed much of the Castle in 1646 to stop it being used in the future. But some of the ruined stone was used in the building of the village and the houses are built of local stone, making the village one of the most attractive in Dorset! . Have a lovely Tuesday! ☀️ Wonderful shot by @jan_mewald 🇬🇧 Want your Photos of Britain to be featured? Follow and tag us! ‘Ta! 🇬🇧

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2 weeks ago

Oh dear, it’s Monday again. Do you ever yearn for a big adventure away from the worries of life? Let's escape through The Shire with this great shot from Sussex, England. How beautiful is this ancient footpath! Pretty sure I see the shape of Bilbo Baggins in the distance, probably on the way home to his "nice hole by the fire, with the kettle just beginning to sing!". Love this by @nickdautlich This lane follows an ancient track along the route of the London to Chichester Roman road. Can you imagine the stories told my those walking along this path for thousands of years, shaped with every passing footstep into this hollow tunnel-like view . This beautiful public footpath is near Halnaker, a hamlet a few miles north of Chichester in West Sussex, in the South Downs National Park. Other Roman roads were long (and mostly straight ) roads, mainly designed for military use, created by the Roman Army during the nearly four centuries (43 – 410 AD ) that Britannia was a province of the Roman Empire. It is estimated that about 2,000 miles (3,200 km ) of paved trunk roads (i.e. surfaced roads running between two towns or cities ) were constructed and maintained throughout the province. A considerable number of Roman roads remained in daily use as core trunk roads for centuries after the end of Roman rule in Britain in AD 410. Amazingly, some routes are now part of the UK's national road network! . So apart from the roads...and yeah...the sanitation, medicine, education, wine, public order, irrigation, a fresh water system, and public health, what have the Romans ever done for us? 😁 Lovely shot by @nickdautlich 🇬🇧 To be featured, follow and tag us! 'Ta! 🇬🇧

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2 weeks ago

Where are you in the world this Sunday morning? 🌎 Comment below with the country where you're reading this, and I'll send out another batch of lovely English fudge to random folk! Good morning from gorgeous Devon. It's rainy and blah in Britain at the moment, so this thatched delight with a roaring fire and a stack of unread books would be perfect. Super shot by @sandrawitt99 It's like we've been exploring the forest for days when we finally discover this - the long lost cottage of Devonshire! A real treasure indeed. Love the hare finial on the thatched roof too. But can you spot something a bit unusual with this country cottage? Where the flippin' 'eck are the upstairs windows? . Well, it could be that from 1696 to 1851, a window tax was imposed in England. Believe it or not, but people were taxed for the amount of light that came in their houses via their windows! Isn't that crazy? Hence the expression ‘daylight robbery’. Some home owners even bricked up their windows to save money.. could the original owners have done something similar? Or perhaps they were a bit daft and forgot to add the glass? . Have a wonderful Sunday! Lovely shot by @sandrawitt99 🇬🇧 Want to be featured? Follow and tag us! 'Ta very much! 🇬🇧

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2 weeks ago

Tag a friend that needs to escape the stresses and worries of life, and experience the healing power of nature in wonderful Scotland 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿 Love this stunning time lapse at Glen Etive by  @casperrolsted Can you believe this is Britain? Just incredible. I still think they should film the new Lord of the Rings TV series here! Made famous as James Bond's Skyfall and the film location for Braveheart, you can explore and follow the driving route along the River Etive. This area is a magnet for hikers and explorers alive who may fancy tackling Ben Starav to the south east and the Glen Coe mountains to the north and west. The 28 mile round trip has to be one most beautiful detours in the North West Highlands. The scenery is simply breathtaking. . Now the best thing about Scotland, unlike England, is you are free to wild camp with little restrictions in most places. Aye, there are those people who leave litter and abuse this privilege because..you know..humans. But thankfully there are plenty of good people who keep things tidy and never leave a footprint 🏕 . Have a great Saturday! Wonderful video by @casperrolsted 🇬🇧 To be featured, follow and tag us! 🇬🇧

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2 weeks ago

Could you live in this wonderful Widdington thatched cottage? Yes or No? If you type Yes, I will pop this rectory cottage in the post to you (just add water to inflate ) Love this from near Saffron Walden, in the Uttlesford district of Essex by @lundonlens A rectory is an official residence provided by a church for ministers of religion. Spot the cathedral window designs on the gate? ⛪️ And don't you just love these place names! I used to drive around this part of southern England when I was a young chap. I always remember the fabulously named village of Tolleshunt D'Arcy and the local Tip Tree jam factory. This isn't a paid advert but - Tip Tree jam is the BEST jam. And I'm not just saying that to get free jam for my scones. Tip Tree. The Jam of Kings! (Cc: @tiptreephotos ) . Essex itself means the "Land of the East Saxons" which is directly referring to those cheeky sods who invaded from Saxony, Germany. Time wise, this was around 600-700AD and they mainly settled in the London, Kent and Essex regions. This was just after the fall of the Roman Empire and before the Normans came over in 1066 and gave us a right good battering at Hastings. . Have a peaceful Thursday! Lovely shot by @lundonlens 🇬🇧 Want to be featured? Follow and tag us! 'Ta! 🇬🇧

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3 weeks ago

On a scale of 1-10, how wonky would you rank this wonktastic 500-year old tumblin' down cottage? This bendy timber framed home dates from c.1500 and is a small nugget of the 2,000 years of history here in lovely Lincoln, England. Great shot by @garibaldi1966 This is the appropriately named "Crooked House" just off Steep Hill (love the literal names of places! ) In the distance you can see Lincoln Cathedral. Building commenced in 1072AD and continued in several phases throughout the medieval period. Nearby Lincoln Castle is now the only place in the world where an original 1215 Magna Carta and 1217 Charter of the Forest can be seen side by side. If you see Nicholas Cage snooping around let me know. . For our American chums, both the state declarations of rights and the United States Bill of Rights incorporated several guarantees that were descend from rights protected by Magna Carta. Among these are freedom from unlawful searches and seizures, a right to a speedy trial, a right to a jury trial in both a criminal and a civil case, and protection from loss of life, liberty, or property without due process of law. Sadly the right to unlimited cups of Yorkshire tea and a plate of choccie biscuits was left off by mistake. . Have a lovely, peaceful Monday! Great shot by @garibaldi1966 🇬🇧 Want to be featured? Follow and tag us in the shot! ‘Ta very much! 🇬🇧

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3 weeks ago

Who would you love to watch the Yorkshire sunset with? 🥰 Good morning from wonderful Whitby! It was #YorkshireDay yesterday so let’s have another shot from this amazing county. Beautiful photo by @simon_palmer Love this place...and the cracking fish and chips I had there many years ago when I was but a wee sprog. I tend to base my entire experience on a place by the food I eat there....Give me a well cooked breakfast bap and I'll love you forever and please marry me thanks. These are the famous 199 steps, known locally as the Church Stairs, which rise to the East Cliff. If you stand on the pavement outside the Royal Hotel on Whitby’s West Cliff and look out across the harbour town as the sun goes down, you can pretty much see, in their entirety, the early chapters of the famous "Dracula" story... as this was the exact place that so inspired Bram Stoker. . Amazing history here beyond the legends too...Whitby was originally called Sinus Fari by the Brigantes who were a Celtic tribe controlling large sections of Northern England but by 71 AD they had been conquered by the Romans. In 657 AD Whitby became known as Streonshalh when the then Christian King of Northumbria, Oswy founded a monastery and Abbey there. The Vikings arrived in 867 AD destroying the monastery and renaming the settlement Whitby from the old Norse for White Settlement. . Have a wonderful Friday! Great shot by @simon_palmer 🇬🇧 Want your Photos of Britain to be featured? Follow and tag us! ‘Ta! 🇬🇧

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3 weeks ago

Question: What’s at the end of this 🌈? Best answer will receive a little gift from 🇬🇧 And yes, this is a real rainbow, not added in later, as I know some cheeky sausage will mention that! Love this fresh take on a very popular place by @andymapp Ahhh those traditional cottages, with the gorgeous English countryside in the distance....looks like there may well be a pot of gold at the end of this rainbow! Next to the houses on the right, runs the Grade I listed walls of the ancient Shaftesbury Abbey built by King Alfred the Great; the origins of the wall are not known, but it is presumed to have been built in the 1360s. Quite fancy living alongside a 656 year old place! . Mind you, getting the morning newspapers would involve a small hike. The street is the main setting for the 1973 "Boy on Bike" television ad for Hovis bread, which has been voted Britain's favourite advertisement of all time. That’s why this is is tagged “Hovis Hill” and not Gold Hill. It was directed by the amazing Ridley Scott who a few years later made one of my favourite films ever - Alien! . Have a lovely Thursday! Great shot by @andymapp 🇬🇧 Want your Photos of Britain to be featured? Follow and tag us in the picture too! ‘Ta duck! 🇬🇧

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3 weeks ago

Evenin’ all! Fancy escaping to magical York in Yorkshire, England? Love the atmosphere on this night shot with those lovely twinkly street lights by @waynefrear_photography Eee by ‘eck, it’s like stepping back to medieval times here! Well, perhaps without the plague and people throwing their toilet waste from the upstairs windows. But you get the general gist. Tip: If you DO want to see “Diagon Alley” completely empty... visit at dawn and you'll have it all to yourself (and then grab a nice cup of tea when the lovely Earl Grey tea shop opens! ) The Shambles boast some of the best preserved medieval buildings in the world, many of which date back to the late fourteenth and fifteenth century (around 1350-1475AD ) which is rather gobsmacking. . Thank you all yesterday for the lovely comments - I will continue on as people seem to like the stories... Fantastic shot by @waynefrear_photography 🇬🇧 Want your Photos of Britain to be featured? Follow and tag us in your shots too.Ta!🇬🇧

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4 weeks ago

Blimey - next year will be the 400th anniversary of the famous Mayflower setting sail from England to the New World! Love this shot from Dartmouth, Devon captured by @dartmouthphotographs August 1620 saw the Pilgrim Fathers, in their two ships, The Mayflower and The Speedwell depart from Bayards Cove in Dartmouth for the New World America. Unfortunately, the Speedwell started sinking 300 miles off Lands End and they all returned to Plymouth to hammer the boat and scoff some last minute scones. The Mayflower continued the journey alone to America and created history by driving on the wrong side of the road. . Sadly many years later the Americans decided to chuck perfectly good tea into the Boston harbour and leave Britain behind! Cheeky sausages. Still, we forgive you. Sorry if we can be a bit grumpy about it at times. . Reader: We survived the great heatwave of 2019! Next: 10 days of rain 🌧 Lovely shot by @dartmouthphotographs 🇬🇧 To be featured, follow and tag us! ‘Ta! 🇬🇧

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4 weeks ago

Make us overheated Brits feel better - what’s your top temperature today? I ask as we are due to hit a new (and rather scary ) record of 39c (102.2F ) in London today 🔥 Eeek! I’m going to escape to the country... fancy coming? Love this by @eskimo It’s a national pastime of the Brits to talk about the weather, so if I sound slightly loopy it’s also because I’m quite daft as it is - and this heat isn’t helping matters! I read a report 100 million homes in America have air con - in Britain it’s just 0.5% with that cooling loveliness. I lived in North Carolina for years and the joy of opening your front door to filtered chilled air was pure heaven! . I’m sneaking in this lush shot of the Cotswolds as it’s just lovely and I know it’s naughty but who can resist these views? Keep cool everyone! Fab shot by @eskimo 🇬🇧 Follow and tag for feature...’Ta! 🇬🇧

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4 weeks ago

Can you guess how many bunches of flowers are on this London pub? 50? 250? 2,500? Or.....? 🌺💐🌸 Good Wednesday morning from a very hot Kensington, London! It’s the annual trip to this floral wonder with this fresh shot by @sparrowinlondon Its getting hot hot hot in Britain. It’s so warm you may notice a rare sight: an English chap wearing shorts! Last night thunderstorms rolled across Britain (keeping me awake all night... ) and tomorrow temps of 38c (101F ) are set to break all records. Let me tell you, it’s miserable when you don’t have air conditioning and live in a brick house! It’s like trying to sleep in a pizza oven 🔥 . The Churchill Arms was built in 1750, making it one of the older, more historic pubs in London. In the 1800s, Winston Churchill's Grandparents were regular visitors - which eventually led to the naming of the pub after World War 2. Talk about a job watering all those plants! Still, glad they have that umbrella up just in case it rains later. . Have a wonderful day! Lovely shot by @sparrowinlondon 🇬🇧 To be featured, follow and tag us! ‘Ta! 🇬🇧

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last month

What’s the weather like where you are? I’ve heard some crazy high numbers in America. Hope everyone is keeping cool and safe. Meanwhile in Britain... Rain! 🌧 So the fine folks at Castle Farm in Kent are now starting the annual lavender harvest. Note: They are not at this stage yet so you have time to visit with loads of lavender on show this weekend. Love this shot by @dimitar_hr Apparently, storms are bad news for lavender at this time of the season as all the flowers, heavy with oil, can get hit by raindrops and fall to the floor. Ahh I do love that tudor-framed building and in the background the almost endless purple fields. . Castle Farm is busy 1,100 acre farm that has been in the Alexander family for over a century. The farm has crops of wheat, barley, rapeseed, hops, apples, lavender and a large herd of beef cattle. The original lavender plants the family started with came from France and, rather in the same way that English wine growers have proven that certain grapes can do very well in some English soils – it turns out that the Alexanders and their chalky Kentish ground at Castle Farm are now producing such quality lavender oil that they are exporting it back to France! Awkward. . Have a lovely Friday! Super shot by @dimitar_hr 🇬🇧 To be featured, follow and tag us! 🇬🇧

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last month

Could you live in this cottage surrounded by the smell of fresh lavender? Yes or no? 🥰 Aye, I think I could just about manage it here in the beautiful Cotswold hills, overlooking Broadway and the Vale of Evesham. Love this @lensereflection The Romans first brought lavender to England thousands of years ago (okay...apart from the lavender, what have the Romans ever done for us.... ) It’s possible that Phoenician traders had already introduced it through trade, but the Romans were the first to commercially grow it as a crop for their use and were probably the first to grow Lavender on the Cotswolds to provide supplies for their soldiers. Have you ever sprayed lavender on your pillow at night? It’s a wonderful way to improve sleep. Although I accidentally sprayed my face last night as it was too dark to see my pillow 🤪 . Have a lovely Monday! ☀️ Super shot by @lensereflection 🇬🇧 To be featured - follow and tag us! 🇬🇧

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last month

Guess how many castles are still standing in Britain...20? 50? 200? Or?... Comment below! It’s a bit cloudy this morning, so let’s head out to beautiful Bodiam castle in East Sussex, England. What a wonderful shot this is by @ljrouse The castle was built between 1385AD and 1388 and is now owned and managed by the National Trust. As I'm a member, that technically means I own it too. Would they mind awfully if I move in? I'll be most quiet. Spending my days reading books. A few giant feasts, here and there. Occasional battles etc. Fancy joining me? I’ll pop the castle kettle on! . This wonder is set in the heart of an historic landscape and is ready to enthrall with its spiral staircases, battlements and a portcullis - 14th century Bodiam Castle is one of Britain's most picturesque and romantic ancient monuments. Windows where arrows were once fired, a tower that was once a look-out and ruins that were once walked upon by knights. Just my cup of tea! . Have a happy Saturday! 🥰 Lovely shot by @ljrouse 🇬🇧 Want your Photos of Britain to be featured? Follow and tag us in the picture too! ‘Ta!🇬🇧

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last month

What would you name this cottage if you lived here? 🤔 Hmmm... I think I have a thatch addiction issue (say 3 times with a teacake in your gob! ) and this lovely one in Honington, Warwickshire has been sitting in my saved folder for too long...Photo by @ramcharala Don’t you just love the names here... this is Rose Cottage and in the village, there is a half-timbered Magpie Cottage and the Shoemaker's Cottage! It’s like something from a fairytale. Most of the dwellings in the centre of the village are between 100 and 300 years old. A tradition has also started in the village to have a cricket match each summer. The players are drawn from the village and they all join together to make tea and cakes too. When can I move in? 🏏🍰 . Have a wonderful Friday! Super shot by @ramcharala 🇬🇧 To be featured, follow and tag us! ‘Ta! 🇬🇧

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last month

Have a guess - What’s the #1 British takeaway meal? Fish and chips? Curry? Pizza? Chinese food? Comment below! By ‘eck, don’t you just love those glowing street lamps here in Robin Hood’s Bay in gorgeous Yorkshire. Super shot by @w.bkz2018 . Talking of food - Chinese tourists love the fish and chips so much here in Yorkshire, a local chippy is set to open an EXACT replica branch in Chengdu, capital of the province of Sichuan! Scotts Fish and Chips currently has more than 100 Chinese visitors each week. That’s a lot of mushy peas. . A tradition dating back at least to the end of the 16th century gives Robin Hood's birthplace as Loxley, Sheffield, in South Yorkshire. The original Robin Hood ballads, which originate from the fifteenth century, set events in the medieval forest of Barnsdale which is also in Yorkshire. This beautiful costal village also has a tradition of smuggling, and it's said a large network of subterranean passageways link the houses deep underground! . Fancy a visit? Beautiful shot by @w.bkz2018 🇬🇧 To be featured - follow and tag us! ‘Ta! 🇬🇧

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last month

Could you live in a cottage by the sea? Yes or No? We are right at the bottom of Britain... you can wave to France from here 👋🏻 This moody shot looks straight from the pages of an Agatha Christie thriller... Love this by @jakefpollard The cottages here at Cuckmere Haven have become a landmark along with the backdrop of the Seven Sisters chalk cliffs, appearing in films such as the brilliant Atonement. Ahh to walk close to those magnificent chalky cliffs in the South Downs, where kittiwakes and fulmars can be seen alongside Brimstone butterflies and flowering cowslips! The beach down below was also commonly used by smugglers in the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries. Boat loads of the finest French wines and cheeses! 🥰 . Rain is back today but the garden needs it, so all is forgiven. Lovely shot by @jakefpollard 🇬🇧 To be featured - follow and tag us in your Photos of Britain..'Ta!🇬🇧

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last month

Tag a friend who would love to see this stellar view! 💫 Love this perfectly timed shot from the famous Durdle Door, Dorset with the Milky Way in prime position above the 140-million year old natural limestone arch. Brilliant shot by @aaronjenkin There is always something so relaxing about being near the coast...it really soothes the soul to hear the crashing of waves against the sandy shore. Above, billions of stars twinkling away. Bliss! The magnificent Durdle Door itself was formed hundreds of millions of years ago as a cave, with the continual waves moulding its familiar shape. There is also a rocky ledge known as the Fossil Forest close by where you can see the holes left by trees some 145 million years ago. Beautiful, historic and quite busy. But like most places, get there early and enjoy the peace and quiet. . Have a lovely Friday! ☀️ Fantastic shot by @aaronjenkin 🇬🇧 Want your Photos of Britain to be featured? Follow and tag us in the shot. Ta very much! 🇬🇧

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last month

If you won a few million quid would you buy a cute cottage in the Cotswolds, an historic castle in Scotland or a small flat in London? I must admit this thatched delight in Broad Campden, Gloucestershire would be rather tempting! Love this by @brianjannsenphotography Having said that, it would be hard not to get that Scottish pile. Reader, I am a man of small needs. I only require a few lavish medieval themed parties in my old draughty castle. And a cannon. And acres of woodland. Is that too much to ask? Oh and crumpets piled high smothered in butter. Ahem, sorry. Where was I? Oh yes. This lovely place is set in rolling countryside, surrounded by lush fields of grazing sheep, with soothing streams providing a beautiful natural soundtrack. The name Campden appears to be derived from a Saxon phrase meaning, "Valley with fields." And the Campden parish, composed of Chipping Campden, Broad Campden, Berrington, and Wessington, was held by King Harold at the time of the Norman Conquest in 1066AD. Romans... Vikings...Celts.. Normans... we are a mixed bunch over here 🙃 . Have a lovely Wednesday! I’m off to gawp at some gardens. Fantastic shot by @brianjannsenphotography 🇬🇧 To be featured - follow and tag us! 🇬🇧

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last month

Which cottage would you pick? I quite fancy the one on the right on its own. Care to join me - I’ll pop the kettle on. One sugar or two? Who wouldn’t want to live in a cottage in Bibury Village dating from the 1380s... 🥰 Lovely shot by @_alina_dragan_ . Bibury Village in Gloucestershire, England is home to these honey coloured “chocolate box” (so pretty they are often used on chocolate tins! ) Arlington Row was originally a monastic wool store and converted into weavers' cottages in the 17th century. It’s also now probably the most depicted village in the world because since 2010, a picture of the former weavers' cottages has appeared inside U.K. passports. Still no word if my giant scone drawing has made the cut for the next version. . Have a lovely Tuesday! ☀️ Super shot by @_alina_dragan_ 🇬🇧 To be featured - follow and tag us! ‘Ta! 🇬🇧

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Comment the first thought that comes into mind when you see this peaceful view - For me: Bliss! 🥰 Blimey, it's been boiling here in Britain this weekend. Although I'd love to be on this slow boat on the River Stour flowing gently through Canterbury, Kent, England with a good book and a small picnic. Do you have any special Sunday plans? Lovely shot by @daring_lines Love the lush green reeds in this picture, in what's generally considered to be England’s most historic river. Certainly in Roman and medieval times the river was a major transport route, connecting Canterbury with mainland Europe. As you would expect, everything has a long and flowing history in good old Blighty. The name Stour has existed since A.D. 686, thanks to those cheeky invading Saxons. After flowing through Canterbury the river becomes tidal and eventually enters the sea at Pegwell Bay, close to the site of the landing of the first Christian mission to southern England, St Augustine, in 597 AD. . It officially hit 34C (93.2F ) in London around 5pm yesterday - surpassing the temperatures of Rio, Miami and Cuba! Thankfully it's a wee bit cooler today. Hope you have a wonderful, peaceful Sunday! Lovely shot by @daring_lines 🇬🇧 Want your Photos of Britain to be featured? Follow and tag us in the picture too...! 'Ta ducky 🇬🇧

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What’s your top temperature today? It’s going to hit 33c (92F! ) today in Britain 🔥🥺 Not a fan without air conditioning! Still, I think we may be getting a bumper Lavender harvest this year with all the early rain and sun we’ve had recently. Love this shot from Kent, England by @talexanderphotography This is the glorious lavender fields at the Hop Shop at Castle Farm ( @thehopshop_kent ) - and I do love me some lavender. History states that the Romans brought it to England (‘ta! ) and were the first to commercially grow it as a crop for their use - and were also probably the first to grow it to provide supplies for their soldiers. Its all round healing qualities making it the first choice for many ailments, and one of the first natural antiseptics. . When the Romans left England, lavender was grown extensively by monks as part of their physic gardens. These provided a whole range of herbal remedies. . Lavender soon became entwined within English folklore. A lavender cross was often hung on the door to ward off evil spirits. During the Great Plague of the 17th century people would tie lavender bunches to their wrists to guard against infection. In 16th century it was effectively used to guard against cholera! . If I have one piece of advice to give you: Wear Sunscreen. Beautiful shot by @talexanderphotography 🇬🇧 To be featured, follow and tag us! 🇬🇧

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Question: Tea with milk or tea without? Important I know, Meghan Markle is on the phone and isn’t sure. ‘Ta! Shall we escape the city and head into the wilds of...London? Love this photo by @cathgothardphotography Isn’t this magical! ✨ These deer roam freely in the biggest Park in all of London town - Richmond Park. Aye, the capital city is more than just fancy pants buildings and jellied eels. Royalty had taken a close interest in the Richmond area from the late 15th century when King Henry Vll built a palace in the Manor of Sheen. No relation to Charlie. Henry and his successors hunted in the neighbourhood. But it was a visit to Richmond by King Charles I in 1625 that turned this area of medieval farms and pasture into a royal park. Many of the trees there pre-date this and Richmond Park supports more 500-year-old trees than France and Germany combined. Fancy! . Have a lovely Friday! It’s getting hot ☀️ Lovely shot by @cathgothardphotography 🇬🇧 To be featured, follow and tag us! 🇬🇧

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Morning! Ahhh, the benefits of a soggy start to an English summer: Lots of beautiful bloomin' poppies! 🌺 What a delight it's been in the past week near the home of Mr Darcy, in Derbyshire, England. Gorgeous photo by @jonclarkphoto And look - spot the little old shepherds hut in the distance next to the tree? Perfect. This landscape has inspired so many artists and writers including, of course one of the most famous English writers of them all, Jane Austen. It's generally believed that Austin's Pride and Prejudice was partly written in Bakewell (which she calls 'Lambton' in her novel ) - as she is said to have stayed at the Rutland Arms in the centre of Bakewell . In the novel, Elizabeth Bennet, heroine of the story, had returned to the inn to dress for dinner, when the sound of a carriage drew her to the window. She saw a curricle driving up the street, undoubtedly Matlock Street which the Rutland Arms windows overlook, and presently she heard a quick foot upon the stair - the very staircase outside Room #2! . But it wasn't just Jane that loved this area. Charlotte Brontë also visited her close friend Ellen Nussey, whose brother Henry was the vicar of Hathersage in the Peaks, in 1845. She stayed for three weeks at the vicarage, around the same time that she was writing Jayne Eyre, which was published in 1847. Other famous writers, including D.H.Lawrence, Roald Dahl and George Eliot, were also so inspired by this beautiful northern English landscape. . Have a wonderful Tuesday 🌺 Lovely shot by @jonclarkphoto 🇬🇧 Want your photos of Britain to be featured? Follow and tag us. 'Ta! 🇬🇧

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Poldark or Demelza - Who would you like to be frolicking on this Cornwall beach with? 🏖 Comment below and I’ll pop your choice into your mailbox later! Photo of Pednvounder beach by @tom bridges . Folks we are about to warm up! Heat from the sands of the Sahara desert in Africa are set to bring 30C (86F ) heatwave to our soggy shores next week. Don’t laugh! That’s hot for us. We have no air conditioning and our scones easily wilt. Ahh but to be here when the heat hits. Love the lush green quilt above with that perfect white sandy beach below. . This is Poldark country... but sadly the upcoming telly series will be the last. After four series galloping across the cliffs of Cornwall, Aidan Turner will hang up his tricorn for good. Poldark has been a huge hit on the BBC and PBS in America. In fact, visitor figures in Cornwall have gone up a staggering 155% since it began. And not only because Poldark occasionally forgets to wear his shirt whilst chopping the weeds. . Have a lovely weekend! ☀️ Great shot by @tom bridges 🇬🇧 To be featured, follow and tag us! 🇬🇧

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June 2019

How many 🇬🇧 are on this picture of Haworth? 30? 100? 120? Or...? Closest to my guess will win a Yorkshire Tea gift package! Love this classic cobbled street that the Brontë sisters walked up daily. Photo by @karlhammettphotography This picturesque village is known worldwide for its association with the Brontë family. Among the novels written by the sisters in the parsonage were Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights, Charlotte's Jane Eyre and Anne's The Tenant of Wildfell Hall. You can also see the recently returned original table where the girls actually wrote! The table has ink blots, a large candle burn and a letter E carved into its surface. . A windswept land of heather and wild moors, it is hardly surprising that this region became the inspiration for the classic works of the Brontë sisters. So much to explore including oodles of cafes and curiosities. All nestled in this gorgeous Yorkshire countryside. Bliss! Have you been? . Have a super Friday! Lovely shot by @karlhammettphotography 🇬🇧 To be featured, follow and tag us! ‘Ta! 🇬🇧

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June 2019

Say Aye! If you love walking in the rain ☔️ I haven’t featured London in yonks, but I do love this atmospheric shot of the city with St Paul’s in the distance and all those twinkly lights by @graphic cal (who is just 15 years old - Brilliant work! ) . For more than 1,400 years, a Cathedral dedicated to St Paul has stood at the highest point in the City. A truly flabbergasting amount of history! The present Cathedral, the masterpiece of Britain's most famous architect Sir Christopher Wren, is at least the fourth to have stood on the site. It was built between 1675 and 1710, after its predecessor was destroyed in the Great Fire of London of 1666. London was only just recovering from the Great Plague of 1665 – which had left as many as 100,000 of its residents dead – when fire broke out on the morning of Sunday, September 2nd. . Mind you, it’s said the great fire burnt away the rats and general plague detritus. And on that happy note - have a lovely day! 😆 Great shot by @graphic cal 🇬🇧 To be featured, follow and tag us! 🇬🇧

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June 2019

Do you believe in fairies, dragons and giants? It's said that those who comment “Yes!” below will be granted a happy and magical life! ✨ This is the magnificently moody Old Man of Storr, on the Isle of Skye in Scotland. Love this by @juusohd Folklore swirls around this incredible rocky pinnacle which towers high over the west of the island. Legend has it that Old Man of Storr was a giant who had lived in Trotternish Ridge and when he eventually died, he was buried in this ancient soil. He was so massive, his thumb juts out from the ground, creating this famous jagged landscape. . So. Fancy escaping this Monday and heading into the wilds of Scotland? I’ll bring a picnic. Super shot by @juusohd 🇬🇧 Want your Photos of Britain to be featured? Follow and tag us in the picture too! ‘Ta! 🇬🇧

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June 2019

Iced Tea or Hot Tea? What kind of cuppa do you fancy this morning? ☕️ Let's head over to this lovely fuzzy green tea room (known as Tu-Hwnt-I'r Bont ) in gorgeous Wales. Can you believe this beauty was built in 1480AD? They must have served millions of slices of fluffy sponge cakes and gallons of tea in that time. Super shot by @lensereflection Love all that creeping green vine that turns wonderfully red in the Autumn. It was originally built as a residential dwelling 539 years ago and later the building was used as the Courthouse for the surrounding area. From here the most serious offenders would have been taken to Tan y Craig in Llanrwst where they could be hanged outside the old gaol (that's the traditional English spelling for "jail" ). Yikes! Okay, I'll stick to the cakes and tea 'ta very much. . Have a lovely Saturday! I'm off for a quick swim on the lawn thanks to all this rain.... Cheers to @lensereflection 🇬🇧 Want your photos of Britain to be featured? Follow and tag us. 'Ta! 🇬🇧

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