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Sundown towns were all-white municipalities or neighborhoods in the U.S. that practiced segregation by excluding non-white residents. Following the end of the Reconstruction Era, many thousands of towns and counties across the United States became sundown towns. Thousands of communities, until the early 1960s, kept out African Americans by law, or even force. These communities were often called "sundown towns" because some of them posted signs at their city limits reading, typically, "Don't Let The Sun Go Down On You In" followed by the town name. Any black person who entered or were found in sundown towns after sunset were subject to harassment, threats, and violence, to include lynching. #RedSummer100 #APeoplesJourney #ANationsStory

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“Slave codes” began to arise in the 1700s to define black life in America, and would be the beginnings of the “black codes” of the mid-1800s. "Slave codes" in the U.S. set rules for enslaved people as property, not persons. Black Codes were laws passed in 1865 and 1866 by Southern states in the United States after the American Civil War in order to restrict the freedom of African Americans. These laws allowed for law enforcement to make arrest for minor infractions and force black people into involuntary servitude. This period began the start of the convict lease system. Both slave codes and black codes were constantly changing to adapt to new needs for social control and cheap labor, and varied by colony—and later by state. All the codes, despite their variation had one thing in common—in all of them the color line was firmly drawn. Many "slave codes" stated: • “No black person (whether slave or free ) may carry weapons, travel without a pass, or lift a hand against a white person”; • “Free blacks and white persons married to blacks are banished from the colony”; • “All negro, mulatto, and Indian slaves are considered real estate”; • “It is legal to dismember an unruly slave.” #Jamestown400 #RedSummer100 #APeoplesJourney #ANationsStory 📸: Convicts leased to harvest timber circa 1915, in Florida.

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In August 1831, Nat Turner led an uprising of those enslaved in Southampton County, Virginia. The rebellion ended with the deaths of about 55 white people. After Turner and his allies had killed several whites, the group tried to make its way to the town of Jerusalem, Virginia. However, word got out of the rebellion, and white men confronted Turner and the rebels along the way. The rebels disbanded, and Turner went into hiding for weeks before he was apprehended on October 30. ⁣ ⁣ He was hanged on November 11, 1831, and his corpse was brutalized. It is thought that Nat Turner was holding a Bible that is now part of our collection when he was captured two months after the rebellion. Turner worked both as an enslaved field hand and as a minister. A man of remarkable intellect, he was widely respected by black and white people in Southampton County, Virginia. He used his talents as a speaker and his mobility as a preacher to organize the slave revolt. #APeoplesJourney #ANationsStory#Jamestown400 ⁣ ⁣ 📷: NYPL, Schomburg Centern for Research in Black Culture

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August 23, 1917, two Houston police officers assaulted an African American woman after raiding her home. A black soldier named Alonso Edwards intervened on the woman’s behalf, and police beat and arrested him. When checking on the the whereabouts of Edwards, Corporal Charles Baltimore was beaten, shot, and arrested. In response, 156 black soldiers of the Third Battalion armed themselves and left for Houston to confront the police about the persistent violence. Outside the city, the soldiers encountered a mob of armed white men who had heard reports of a mutiny. In the ensuing violence, four soldiers, four policemen, and 12 civilians were killed. Afterward, many of the black soldiers were court-martialed and convicted. Forty men received life sentences, and 19 were executed. Newspapers at the time reported that the soldiers had mutinied and attacked innocent white civilians. But an NAACP investigation concluded that the soldiers acted in response to ongoing police brutality. #RedSummer100 #APeoplesJourney #ANationsStory ⁣ ⁣ 📷: National Archives and Records Administration

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Known as the Stono Rebellion, it is the earliest known "slave revolt" in the colonies before the start of the American Revolution. Over sixty enslaved Africans set out in 1739 to demand their freedom on a South Carolina plantation. The group ended up killing at least twenty whites before they were intercepted by the South Carolina militia. Most of the rebels were eventually executed, but a few survivors were sold to the West Indies. ⁣ In response, South Carolina passed the Negro Act of 1790 that restricted slave assembly, education, and movement. They also required approval for all statewide manumissions following the revolt. #Jamestown400 #APeoplesJourney #ANationsStory

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Slave rebellions carried bloody consequences. Rebels were executed. Family, friends, and neighbors might be beaten and killed. In some cases, slaveholders placed the bloodied and dismembered bodies in public view to remind passersby of slavery’s awful power. Nevertheless, against terrible odds, enslaved people rebelled.⁣ ⁣ The largest slave rebellions included Stono (South Carolina, 1739 ), New York City (1741 ), Gabriel’s Rebellion (Richmond, Virginia, 1800 ), St John’s Parish (Louisiana, 1811 ), Fort Blount (Florida, 1816 ), Vesey’s Rebellion (Charleston, South Carolina, 1822 ), Nat Turner’s Rebellion (Southampton County, Virginia, 1831 ), Amistad Mutiny (slave ship, 1839 ), and the Creole Revolt (slave ship, 1841 ). #Jamestown400 ⁣ ⁣ 📷: Courtesy Library of Congress

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On August 9, 1936, track and field star Jesse Owens won his fourth gold medal at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin, Germany. Owens's victory was extremely subversive. Nazi Party leader Adolf Hitler intended on using the Games as a demonstration of Aryan superiority and as an opportunity to fuel Nazi propaganda. Hitler's plan was foiled as Germans celebrated Owens as a hero and Owens's name rose to global prominence.⁣ ⁣ Owens was born in Oakville, Alabama on September 12, 1913. As a youth, Owens became a part of the Great Migration when he and his family moved to Cleveland in the 1920s for better economic opportunities. After his athletic career, Owens became secretary of the Illinois State Athletic Commission. #APeoplesJourney #GameChangers 📷: Courtesy @smithsoniannpg

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During off-peak season, from September through February, STEP UP to the Museum without a pass on weekdays, 10am– 5:30pm. Advance timed passes for weekends (Saturdays and Sundays ) in November are now available! Visit our website (link in bio ). #APeoplesJourney 📹: @demraiderboyz

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Pauline Johnson and Felice Boudreaux (pictured here ), sisters, were once enslaved on the plantation of Dermat Martine, near Opelousas, Louisiana. Turn the volume up to hear an excerpt from Pauline on their experience as enslaved children. The voice is a re-enactment of the words of Pauline documented by the Federal Writers' Project, part of the Works Progress Administration, during the Great Depression. For more stories visit LOC.GOV and search “federal writers project” or read our blog “To Freedom: Voices of the formerly Enslaved.” #APeoplesJourney #ANationsStory #hiddenherstory #Jamestown400

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For four centuries, enslavers sailed along the western African coast to pack the hulls of their ships with “a full complement of negroes.” Millions of captive Africans were loaded onto slave ships as commodities certain to bring a profit. The traumatic journey from western African to the Caribbean and the Americas became known as the Middle Passage⁣. ⁣ During the 1500s trade relations grew between Africans and Europeans along the western coast of Africa. By 1700 the trade in enslaved people had become more lucrative than buying and selling spices and precious metals. The plantation system was expanding rapidly in the Americas, and the European demand for slave labor pulled a steady stream of captives from the African interior. This trade stripped African people of their freedom, resulting in a new form of enslaver that treated humans as property. #APeoplesJourney #ANationsStory #Jamestown400

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African American family reunions date back to Emancipation. The formerly enslaved would place “Information Wanted” advertisements in newspapers in search of family. The Great Migration, between 1915-1940, of nearly four million African Americans from the South to the North, would greatly inspire family reunions. During these gatherings, extended family was significant, as families were separated and new kinship ties were formed in bondage. This family tradition became a tangible symbol of memory and resilience that endured slavery. Today, African American family reunions continue as an intergenerational celebration of community, fellowship, and heritage. Do you and your family host a family reunion? #APeoplesJourney 📸: Digital image of a Perryman family reunion, 1996, Gift of Eddie Faye Gates, Tulsa OK, author, historian, community activist, Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.

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Going on a summer road trip or sightseeing, tell us which historical sites you are visiting this summer. Share below! See our previous posts for a few regional African American cultural sites, from the east to the west and north to south, you can visit too! Explore your local communities and discover new sites that commemorate African American history and culture. This Travelguide booklet is from 1955, and catered solely to African American vacationers due to segregation. At the bottom of the booklet is the Travelguide's motto: "Vacation & Recreation, Without Humiliation." #APeoplesJourney #ANationsStory 📸: ©1955 Travelguide, Inc. All Rights Reserved, Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Edwin and Gladys Robinson Estate

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In 1900, Sgt. William Carney became the first African American to receive a Congressional Medal of Honor for valor during the Civil War. On July 18, 1863, the 54th Massachussetts U.S. Colored Infantry began its assault on Ft. Wagner. Charging uphill into battle, the unit suffered terrible losses. When a color bearer fell, Sgt. Carney caught the Union flag and never let it touch the ground. He was subsequently awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions at Ft. Wagner. #WWI #CivilWar #APeoplesJourney #ANationsStory

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Ebenezer Baptist Church was an important site for the Civil Rights Movement. It is where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was baptized, ordained and served as co-pastor with his father until 1968. The church played a valuable role in influencing King’s Christian values and his pursuit of justice and equality. The SCLC was founded at meetings held at Ebenezer Baptist Church in January 1957. From 1957 to 1968, the church was the site of numerous SCLC executive staff and governing board meetings, as well as the 1967 SCLC annual convention. Ebenezer Baptist Church also symbolizes the crucial role of black ministers and black churches in the Civil Rights Movement. Today the church is part of the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historical Park and is still active today as a thriving ministry that connects with visitors from around the globe both in person and virtually through its digital home, Ebenezer Everywhere. Visit the historic site in Atlanta, Georgia. #APeoplesJourney 📸: Crowd gathered outside of Ebenezer Baptist Church after the first birthday celebration in memory of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., © Horace Henry, Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Horace C. Henry.

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Born on this day in 1935, Diahann Carroll was a trailblazer, who in the 1960s became the first African American woman to star in a television series. The 1968 show, Julia, was seen as a landmark achievement for Black actors on television. In the midst of the Civil Rights Movement, NBC premiered “Julia” in September 1968 starring Diahann Carroll as the title character. The series followed a single mother who worked as a nurse to take care of her young son (Marc Copage ), after being widowed when her husband died in the Vietnam War. The series was one of the few during its time that did not use a laugh track and relied on studio audiences. “Julia” debuted at number two and went on to stay in the top ratings spot during its entire first season. The series offered viewers a positive image of a middle class professional black woman, something that had never been shown before on television. #HiddenHerstory #APeoplesJourney 📸: Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

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#Onthisday journalist and civil rights activist Ida Bell Wells was born into slavery in 1862, and emancipated by the Union Army six months later. She leaves behind a legacy as a voice for the voiceless, as one of our nation’s foremost critics of a racial injustice and a journalistic champion of the truth. After a tragic illness, Wells lost her parents and moved to Memphis, TN. She began her career in activism early as a student at Fisk University. Wells turned to writing and began chronicling issues of race and politics in the Deep South. Under the name “lola,” Wells became a leading voice on issues of racial injustice and eventually owned three newspapers including; Memphis Free Speech, Headlight and the Free Speech. However, it was the deaths of Tom Moss, Calvin McDowell and Will Stewart—three African American business owners in Memphis—that ignited her charge to take on lynching. Moss, McDowell and Stewart were killed after they opened a grocery store that directly competed with a white-owned store and drove business away. In response, Wells traveled the South gathering records of lynchings and wrote “Southern Horrors: Lynch Laws in All its Phases” in 1892. Her reports outraged southern whites and she was never able to return to Memphis. In 1898 she took her anti-lynching campaign all the way to the White House, urging President William McKinley to act to save black lives. Although several bills would be introduced, the United States has never explicitly outlawed lynching. #APeoplesJourney #hiddenherstory 📸: Tennessee State Library and Archives

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This deed of sale records the sale of an enslaved man named Pierre (born 1835 ) by Christian Mehle of Jefferson Parish, Louisiana and Hortaire Inbau to James Roberts, both of New Orleans, Louisiana, on December 8, 1860. Pierre was twenty-five years old and was sold for $1,300.00. The core zone of sugar production ran along the Mississippi River, between New Orleans and Baton Rouge, and was heavily reliant upon enslaved labor. The Whitney Plantation in Louisiana, has been preserved as a museum to tell the stories of enslaved people like Pierre. In 1795, there were 19,926 enslaved Africans in Louisiana. The German Coast, where Whitney Plantation is located, was home to 2,797 enslaved laborers. After the United States outlawed the Atlantic slave trade in 1807, many captives came to Louisiana from the Upper South through the domestic slave trade. Thousands were smuggled from Africa and the Caribbean through the illegal slave trade. Over the course of the nineteenth century the population of enslaved Africans skyrocketed. Just before the Civil War in 1860, there were 331,726 enslaved people in Louisiana. The German Coast’s population of enslaved people had grown four times since 1795, to 8,776. #APeoplesJourney #ANationsStory 📸: Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift from the Liljenquist Family Collection

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#OnThisDay African American businesswoman Maggie L. Walker was born in 1864, in Richmond, Virginia. In 1899, Walker became the grand secretary for the Independent Order of St. Luke, an organization dedicated to the social and financial advancement of African Americans. It was a position she held until her death in 1934. Walker seized control during a troubling time for the organization — it was facing a financial crisis. Walker founded the St. Luke Herald newspaper in 1902 to improve communication between the organization's chapters. She also opened the St. Luke Penny Savings Bank, becoming the first African American woman to charter a bank in the United States. In 1905, she opened the St. Luke Emporium, a department store specially created with African American employees and shoppers in mind. #APeoplesJourney #HiddenHerstory 📸: Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C. ), Archives Center, National Museum of American History

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In July of 1963 in Americus, Georgia, fifteen girls were jailed for challenging segregation laws. Ages 12 to 15, these girls had marched from Friendship Baptist Church to the Martin Theater on Forsyth Street. Instead of forming a line to enter from the back alley as was customary, the marchers attempted to purchase tickets at the front entrance. Law enforcement soon arrived and viciously attacked and arrested the girls. Never formally charged, they were jailed in squalid conditions for forty-five days in the Leesburg Stockade, a Civil War era structure situated in the back woods of Leesburg, Georgia. Only twenty miles away, parents had no knowledge of where authorities were holding their children. Nor were parents aware of their inhumane treatment. Soon after the March on Washington, during the same week of the bombing of the five little girls at Sixteenth Street Baptist Church on September 15, 1963, law enforcement released the Leesburg Stockade Girls and returned them to their families. Their story was part of the broader Civil Rights effort that engaged children in a variety of nonviolent, direct actions. The history of children’s civil rights activism continues to be important to tell. The Leesburg Stockade Girls are an incredible example of those courageous, young freedom fighters. Read the full story on our BLOG: s.si.edu/2ugPmeo #APeoplesJourney #HiddenHerstory 📹: Georgia Public Broadcasting

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“Harlem of the West,” is what Five Points, Denver, CO, a predominately African American neighborhood, came to be known. The community of nearly 6,000 residents included black doctors, lawyers, dentists, clergy, railroad porters, as well as cooks, janitors, domestic servants and funeral directors. The community was created when African Americans were prohibited from buying in other areas of Denver. The community’s Welton Street was home to over fifty bars and clubs, where jazz musicians Billie Holiday, Duke Ellington, Miles Davies, Dizzy Gillespie, and others performed. The Rossonian Hotel, built in 1912, was where many African American stayed when they visited town due to Jim Crow laws. The Denver Black American West Museum helps preserve the history of African Americans in the West. Visit to learn more! #APeoplesJourney 📸: Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of JoAnn Oxley Foster

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The trial of Huey Newton in 1967, brought the Black Panther Party into international prominence and made Huey a revolutionary icon during 3 years of rallies and protests by tens of thousands of people across North America to "Free Huey." This photograph is of a Black Panther rally in 1970, in San Francisco, California. In October of 1966, college students Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale founded The Black Panther Party for Self-Defense. The Black Panther Party for Self-Defense existed for roughly 16 years from 1966 to 1982. In that short time, the Party launched almost 70 chapters across the United States and several chapters and affiliates abroad. Learn more about the history of the Black Panther Party at the African American Museum and Library at Oakland, dedicated to the discovery, preservation, interpretation and sharing of historical and cultural experiences of African Americans in California and the West. #APeoplesJourney 📷: © Stephen Shames, Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.

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Our Museum family mourns the loss of architect Philip G. Freelon. "Though, our hearts are heavy, they are filled with appreciation for his vision, his passion and his love for our museum." - Smithsonian Secretary & NMAAHC Founding Director Lonnie G. Bunch Freelon used his professional career to create architecture that serves African American communities. Freelon, a Philadelphia native, graduated from North Carolina State University’s College of Design with a Bachelor of Environmental Design and received a Master of Architecture degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In 1990, Freelon founded his own firm, The Freelon Group, in Durham, North Carolina. The Freelon Group was one of the partners responsible for the planning, design, and construction of our Museum.⁣ ⁣ Freelon had a long history of designing African American cultural institutions, including the Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco, the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture in Baltimore, the Center for Civil and Human Rights in Atlanta, and the Harvey B. Gantt Center for African-American Arts + Culture in Charlotte. Freelon was keen to create architecture that is accessible and inspiring to all people. These designs highlight the connection between a building’s architecture, its purpose and its community.⁣ #APeoplesJourney ⁣ 📷: Gift of Philip G. Freelon

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This pastor's chair, in our collection, is from the First African Methodist Episcopal (AME ) Church of Los Angeles. It is the oldest church founded by African Americans in Los Angeles, dating back to 1872. The church was established in 1872 by Biddy Mason, an African American nurse and a California real estate entrepreneur and philanthropist, and her son-in-law Charles Owens. Mason saved her earnings and bought her first piece of land for $250 on South Spring Street, becoming one of the first African Americans to own land in the state. The organizing meetings for the church were held in Mason's home on Spring Street and she donated the land for the church to be built. Visit @CAAMinLA for more history of African Americans in Los Angeles. #APeoplesJourney #BlackFaith #gODTalk 📸: Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of First A.M.E. Church of Los Angeles

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Following the #TourDeFrance 🚲? African American cyclist Marshall "Major" Taylor smashed the racial barrier in professional cycling. Taylor broke through the color lines of bicycle racing to become the world's first black cycling champion, and the first African American world champion of any sport, yet despite his incredible accomplishments few know his amazing story. Born near Indianapolis in 1878, Taylor worked in a bicycle shop to help support his family, where he earned his nickname "Major" while performing stunts in an army uniform to attract customers. Taylor's first race was a publicity stunt by his employer who entered Taylor in an amateur race without his knowledge. Taylor was oblivious until his employer pushed him to starting line, but the cheers of the crowd inspired him forward resulting in Taylor's first victory at the young age of 13. However, over the next twenty years Taylor became one of the world's most famous bicycle racers. By 1898 Taylor held seven world records including the one-mile, and in 1900 was named the National Cycling Champion. #APeoplesJourney 📸: NY Public Library

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Over 200,000 African American soldiers and sailors served in the U.S. Army and Navy during the Civil War. Their service helped to end the war and free over four million enslaved African Americans. The African American Civil War Memorial in Washington, D.C. honors their service and sacrifice. The United States Colored Troops made up over ten percent of the Union or Northern Army even though they were prohibited from joining until July 1862, fifteen months into the war. On September 27, 1862, the first regiment to become a United States Colored Troops (USCT ) regiment was officially brought into the Union army. Visit the African American Civil War Memorial or visit their website to search their database of U.S. Colored Troops and soldiers. #APeoplesJourney #ANationsStory 📸: Tintype of Creed Miller, an African American soldier belonging to the Kentucky 107th Regiment, Company E (and later Company C ), Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.

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In July of 1852, Frederick Douglass delivered a speech titled “What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?,” a call for the promise of liberty to be applied equally to all Americans: “The rich inheritance of justice, liberty, prosperity, and independence bequeathed by your fathers is shared by you, not by me. The sunlight that brought light and healing to you has brought stripes and death to me. This Fourth of July is yours, not mine. You may rejoice, I must mourn...What, to the American slave, is your Fourth of July?” Douglass’s speech emphasized that American slavery and American freedom is a shared history and that the actions of ordinary men and women, demanding freedom, transformed our nation. Frederick Douglass's home in Washington, DC's historic Anacostia community ( @frederickdouglassnps ), stands as a testament to his legacy and commitment. #APeoplesJourney #ANationsStory 📸: Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.

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Did you attend a Historically Black College or University (HBCU )? ⁣ ⁣ Booker T. Washington became the first principal of the newly founded Tuskegee⁣ Normal and Industrial Institute (later Tuskegee University ), in July of 1881 in Tuskegee, Alabama. Originally named the Normal School for Colored Teachers, the institute acquired university status in 1985. Formerly a student and teacher at Hampton Institute (later University ), an HBCU in Hampton, Virginia, Washington embraced the philosophy of industrial education and believed that moral uplift and mastery of technical skills were essential for the advancement of black Americans. Tuskegee University, Hampton⁣ University, and other early HBCU's educated a new generation of students, educators, historians and scientists, now free from enslavement. HBCU's continue to be an important hub of African American education, culture and life. #APeoplesJourney ⁣ ⁣ 📸: A history class conducted at the Tuskegee Institute in 1902, Library of Congress.

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This painting depicts servants at a water pump in Weeksville, Brooklyn, New York. In 1968 an archaeology project conducted by local activists and students uncovered the remains of a free black community. Established in 1838, Weeksville was a thriving, self-sufficient community resurrected as a historic landmark and cultural center in 1971. Explore the story of Brooklyn's historic black community at the site of @weeksvilleheritagecenter ! #APeoplesJourney

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Today marks the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and celebrates the long legacy of freedom fighters in American history.⁣ ⁣ The passage of the act helped to provide federal job opportunities for African Americans, strengthened voting laws, lessened racial restrictions on the use of public facilities, and limited the federal funding of discriminatory aid programs. #APeoplesJourney

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The National Anti-Slavery Standard was the offficial weekly newspaper of the American Anti-Slavery Society headquartered in New York. The American Anti-Slavery Society was founded by William Lloyd Garrison in 1833, and by 1840, 2,000 auxillary societies formed with membership ranging between 150,000 to 200,000. The societies signed antislavery petitions to be sent to Congress, published journals and enlisted subscriptions, printed and distributed propaganda in vast quantities, and sent out agents and lecturers to carry the antislavery message to Northern audiences. Visit the African Burial Ground National Monument to learn more about the presence of enslaved Africans in New York. #APeoplesJourney 📸: Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.

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Hit the road with us this summer! We're journeying to regional African American cultural sites, from the east to the west, north to south! Along the way, explore your local communities and discover new sites to commemorate African American history and culture. What historical places or sites are you headed to this summer? #APeoplesJourney

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The Stonewall Riots catalyzed the LGBTQ+ community to unite in a movement to seek equal rights for all people, no matter their sexual orientation or gender identity. Prior to 1973, homosexuality was considered a mental illness and something that was required to be treated. After Stonewall, African Americans started their own LGBTQ+ organizations to support their multiple intersections of identity. Established in 1985, Us Helping Us began as a group of volunteers that provided holistic health information for LGBTQ+ African Americans living with AIDS. Other orgs included the Salsa Soul Sisters and the National Coalition of Black Gays. In In 1991, the Center for Black Equity established Black Pride in DC. Black Prides became popular because they provided a safe space to come together to celebrate the duality of being both Black/African American and LGBTQ+. #SmithsonianPride 📸: © Ron Simmons, Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Ron Simmons.

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Today marks the 50th Anniversary of the Stonewall Rebellion, the start of the modern LGBTQ+ Rights Movement. African Americans in this community have made enormous achievements and contributions to history & culture. Join us in celebrating this rich history! Historical scholarship has unearthed a world of saloons, cabarets, speakeasies, rent parties, and drag balls that existed since the late 1800’s as spaces where African American LGBTQ identities were not only visible, but openly celebrated. At the beginning of the 20th century, a distinctly Black LGBTQ culture took shape in Harlem. The Harlem Renaissance (1920-1935 ) was particularly influential to this process literature, art, and music that centered black life. Many of the movement’s leaders were openly gay or identified as having nuanced sexualities including Angelina Weld Grimké, Claude McKay, Langston Hughes, Wallace Thurman, Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Alain Locke, and Richard Bruce Nugent among others. Explore more LGBTQ+ stories on our website! #SmithsonianPride #Stonewall50 📸: © Roderick Terry, 1995, Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Roderick Terry

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¡NOSOTROS GENTE! (We the People! ) is dedicated to Afro-Ecuadorian oral historian, storyteller and folklorist, Juan García Salazar (1944-2017 ), pictured above, who donated the first object to our collection.⁣ ⁣ The object, a boat seat, features a carving of Anansi the Spider, the African folktale figure, and represents an ancestral bridge between West Africa and the Americas. Join us on Sunday, June 30th at 4pm in the Oprah Winfrey Theater. Visit our website for upcoming events! #DiasporaLens ⁣ ⁣ ------⁣ ¡NOSOTROS GENTE! Está dedicado a Juan García Salazar (1944-2017 ), arriba, el historiador, narrador y folklorista afroecuatoriano, quien donó el primer objeto a la colección de NMAAHC.⁣ ⁣ El objeto, banco de canoa, presenta una talla de Anansi la araña, la figura del cuento popular africano, y representa un puente ancestral entre África Occidental y las Américas. #DiasporaLens ⁣ 📷: Patrick Breslin⁣

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